Primary Care Home featured in New Care Models Multispecialty Community Provider Framework

Written: 28 July 2016

28th July 2016

Primary Care Home featured in New Care Models Multispecialty Community Provider framework

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) today welcomes the publication of a new framework setting out how to be a multispecialty community provider.

The document defines what being a multispecialty community provider (MCP) means by assembling features from the 14 MCP vanguards into a common framework. In turn, the 14 will be adopting or adapting the framework for their diverse local communities, as they progress from their current status as aspirant MCPs towards full maturity.

The framework includes the ‘Primary Care Home’, the joint programme between the NAPC and NHS Confederation, that develops NAPC’s primary care home model in line with the MCP care hub or neighbourhood approach, supporting the health and wellbeing needs of a registered population of 30,000 – 50,000.

NAPC Chairman, Dr Nav Chana said:

“The NAPC launched the Primary Care Home model in 2015 as a solution to delivering improvements in personalised care and local population health outcomes and the triple aims of the 5 Year Forward View. It provides a mechanism through which local providers - primary, secondary, social, community and voluntary – come together as 'one organisation' to focus on improving wellness and care services for their local communities and patients, improving patient experience, workforce satisfaction and use of existing NHS resources”. 

The features of the PCH model are:

- provision of care to a defined, registered population of between 30,000 and 50,000 people;

- an integrated workforce, with a strong focus on partnerships spanning primary, secondary, community and social care;

- a combined focus on the personalisation of care with improvements in population health outcomes;

- alignment of clinical and financial drivers with appropriate shared risks and rewards.

Supported by the New Care Models programme, NAPC currently have 15 Rapid Test Sites with plans to extend the model nationally to  more PCH Sites over 2016/17.

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Finding Solutions for General Practice

Written: 5 July 2016

I am delighted to introduce the next report, in the series of meetings of National Primary Care Network (NPCN), managed by the National Association of Primary Care. 

The NPCN is a unique group in many ways, as its participants and reach demonstrate the strategic direction for Primary Care and possibly represents the most integrated voice for Primary Care currently available. It provides a safe place for healthy debate, the sharing of ideas and keeps thought leaders in reflective mode. The issues addressed in this report are far reaching and provide many solutions to some of the challenges we seem to have been admiring for far too long.

The participants who helped create this report are self selected from an invitation that goes to all of those professionals involved in health and healthcare who have made themselves available to this network. I hope that this report helps to stimulate further debate and thinking in delivering real and achievable solutions with take home messages that are ready for implementation.

I hope you enjoy the read.

Dr James Kingsland OBE 

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New Primary Care Model Yielding Early Results

Written: 9 May 2016

Several sites testing a new approach to primary care have reported seeing a positive impact on care and services, just months after beginning to pilot the Primary Care Home model.

One locality has reported a step change in its recruitment of community nurses, as nurses see the benefits of the pioneering way of working and are keen to get involved.

And other sites have spoken of making progress towards reconfiguring care, with several GP practices using and developing different approaches to deal with capacity issues.

The developments were shared at a meeting of the 15 rapid test sites involved in the Primary Care Home programme on 28 April. The programme is being led by the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) and the NHS Confederation.
 

Reshaping primary care

Primary Care Home (PCH) is a form of multispecialty community provider model (MCP). Aligned with the vision of the Five Year Forward View, the model aims to re-shape the way primary care services are delivered, based on local population needs.  
 

Key features include:  

  • Provision of care to a defined, registered population of between 30,000 and 50,000
     
  • Aligned clinical financial drivers through a unified, capitated budget with appropriate shared risks and rewards 
     
  • An integrated workforce, with a strong focus on partnerships spanning primary, secondary and social care
     
  • A combined focus on personalisation of care with improvements in population health outcomes.

Patients will benefit from easy access to a single integrated, multidisciplinary team drawn from a wide range of health and social care professionals. The team could include GPs, community nurses, physiotherapists, pharmacist and specialists from social care. 

Working at this scale will ensure that everyone within the team knows everyone else, with  the patient not needing to deal with multiple specialists and organisations. 

The aim is to provide care to patients that is significantly more person-centred, joined-up, proactive and convenient.

Progress to date 

Four months on from being selected to take forward the new care model, the 15 sites met in London to discuss their progress to date and share experiences. The test sites are all at different stages, but some are already seeing a positive impact. 

Many are focusing on common themes, including an emphasis on co-location of community staff within GP services. Some are concentrating on developing specific roles to look at improving prescribing and medication control. Others are developing joined-up IT systems to better share data and resources.

Several of the 15 are working with academic institutions to evaluate their impact and this will be the real test for being able to demonstrate value. 
 

Common challenges

The event uncovered common themes regarding challenges, including long-term sustainability. Some localities are working towards better engagement and buy-in from their clinical commissioning group. 

How the PCH model will be reflected in the national conversation about MCP contracting was also raised as a concern. NAPC, the NHS Confederation’s primary care provider network, will be taking this forward in conversation with the national bodies. 

This article was originally published by NHS Confederation.

 

Press Statement : General Practice Forward View 21/04/16

Written: 21 April 2016

For immediate release - 21st April 2016

NAPC has always identified Primary Care in both form, a level in a health system and function, a strategy for organising approaches to care. Primary Care remains the first point of contact for health needs which must be patient, not disease led. 

Dr Nav Chana, NAPC Chairman said today "We welcome the additional funding for the NHS, with investment targeted to primary care leading to the development of new models of primary and community care as set out in the FYFV. New models of care, for example the Primary Care Home, focused on improving outcomes that matter to people could go a long way to providing the solutions we need for a sustainable NHS.”

Dr Chana went on to say “Primary care organised around general practice has a pivotal role to play but it must be transformed to face challenges. We encourage this transformation to recognise the wider primary care workforce to support general practice to meet the health and social care needs of its population.”

NAPC welcomes the changes to help practices with workforce and care redesign to alleviate workload pressure, in particular, the statements in the General Practice Forward View on expanding and supporting GPs and the wider primary care staffing. Never has the need been greater for more sophisticated, practical and workable approaches to recruitment and retention, as well as encouraging strong endeavours to collaborative working, building partnerships and developing the primary care skills mix.

“Self care, patient activation and promoting practice and pharmacy based care navigation has been a strong focus for the NAPC and we are encouraged that these and others have been identified as part of the solution to a sustainable primary and community health care system.

“In order to really make a difference to the health of our communities, we have to have the will and the means to build collaborative networks, embracing technology better and recognising and developing a different skill mix within and across primary care teams.“ Dr Chana said.

NAPC also welcomes the continued approach to bureaucracy reduction and plans to streamline
CQC inspections.

Dr James Kingsland, President of NAPC said “We welcome NHS England’s commitment to reducing bureaucracy and support technological innovations that will enable professionals to spend more time with their patients. Clinicians must be liberated from over burdensome administrative work which deflects from
patient care.”


As an organisation at the forefront of defining and testing new models of working through its Primary Care Innovation Network (PIN), National Association of Provider Organisations (NAPO), National Primary Care Network (NPCN) and Nurses Voice, NAPC will continue to encourage and empower primary care to try
new things to improve the health and wellbeing of local people.

ENDS
Notes to editors:
• The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is an organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. NAPC offers support through associate membership to those bodies which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests.
• NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.
• Find out more at http://www.napc.co.uk/
• For media enquiries, contact Marketing & Communications Min Grout, min@napc.co.uk
• For general enquires, contact napc@napc.co.uk 020 7636 7228
• Follow NAPC on Twitter @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care
Lettsom House 11 Chandos Street London W1G 9DP

 

 

 

 

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Mar 2015 - Wolverhampton Primary Care Home

Written: 11 March 2016

Supported Care Pathways - Monitoring pilot:

The Wolverhampton Total Health Care (WTHC) and West Midlands Fire Service (WMFS) will be strategically working together to develop supportive care pathways for patients who are at risk of repeated admissions to hospitals and frail and vulnerable patients identified by the Wolverhampton Primary Care Home (WPCH).


Background:

Direct Enhanced Service (DES) GP practices as part of their admission avoidances, identify and monitor patients who are at risk of hospital admissions. These are often the 2% of the population that need the most community care. NHS Research also shows that the most vulnerable people who have major diseases increase their risk
of multi morbidity with age needing more complex care; the practices draw up care plans for these patients.

Similar work is done for patients with dementia, learning difficulties or severe and enduring mental health illness.

The care plans usually detail the type of intervention patients may need. This could vary from a review through the GP telephone access by care coordinators from the practice, through to access to the most at risk patients, also to the use of community Matrons.

Whilst WPCH realises that the above networks help patients stay safe at home, however, due to the lack of real time data and coordination between different stakeholders, alongside the lack of targeted prevention interventions, there are circumstances where the patients get admitted to hospital or where more could have been done earlier.

 

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Mar 2015 NPCN - First contact care - high impact improvements

Written: 22 February 2016

At times of great change (which is almost a constant state for the NHS) it is important to create supportive networks and also to reflect on and stimulate debate about successful implementation of change.

The National Primary Care Network will once again in 2016 be doing just this with a nationwide and multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals and managers, mainly from the primary care sector, bringing thought leadership, critical analysis but specifically evidence based solutions to some of the challenges that the NHS continually faces.

At our first meeting of 2016, on 20 January a small group convened to establish the strategic outlook for
the network this year and focus on the outputs planned for 2016. At this first meeting it was decided to use the
collective wisdom of the participants to rapidly respond to the challenge of describing some potentially high
impact and measured developments that they knew about and would endorse.

This short document starts to highlight the art of the possible but specifically succinctly describes some
ongoing and completed pieces of work that have really tried to transform care locally.
I trust you will enjoy the read. 

Dr James Kingsland OBE
President NPCN

 

 

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Press Statement: NAPC comment on 6% reduced funding for pharmacy

Written: 11 February 2016

National Association of Primary Care

For immediate release - 11th February 2016

The National Association of Primary Care, describes the plans by the government to reduce funding to community pharmacy by 6% as “destabilising at a time when we need greater collaboration with our community workforce”.

“At a time when there is focus on GP shortages, it’s incredible that such a crucial part of the health system is being effectively undermined and penalised.”

Strong statements against the cuts and the potential implications have been expressed within the national media and the NAPC lends its support to these comments and to its community pharmacy colleagues.

“While efficiencies need to be made, the health system must become an enabler for community pharmacy to provide good quality of service, maintain and build more trust with patients and allow them to be part of the solution in meeting the objectives of the 5YFV. This means helping not hindering community pharmacy to modernise, collaborate and innovate, both regionally and nationally.”

Community pharmacy already plays a recognised and vital role in the delivery of health care: dispensing medicines, medicine advice, supporting and promoting preventative health measures. However, NAPC have proven and support the fact that community pharmacy can do so much more from treating minor illnesses and medicine optimisation to managing long term conditions and signposting to local support.

Ash Soni, President of the RPS adds “I am delighted to see the NAPC recognising the value and potential of community pharmacists to be a key part of an integrated primary care solution in delivering better care to our population.”

NAPC have run a number of successful Primary Care Innovation (PIN) Projects working closely with both GP Practices and Community Pharmacy demonstrating the enthusiasm and willing of a skills workforce in danger of being underused. These build on existing models such as the Healthy Living Pharmacy aimed at enhancing the role of community pharmacy.

NAPC’s have reported that a workforce skills mix that meet the needs of a local population health must include true integration and collaboration with mutually beneficial goals and incentives. Community pharmacy must be supported as key resources in the new models of care approach for first contact primary care.

 

ENDS

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Press Release : Commission calls for radical rethink of care for older people

Written: 28 January 2016

Care must be driven by the needs of individuals rather than rigid institutions and structures. That is the main message from an independent report published today.

The Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older people is calling for a fundamental change to the way care for older people is designed and delivered. Experts, drawn from across the health and care sector, have called for a radical new approach to urgent care for older people.

People aged over 85 are the fastest growing age group in England, while the population of those aged over 65 is expected to increase by 50 per cent by 2030. It is critical that the health and care system adapts to meet the needs of today’s population. Growing Old Together, published today, sets out key principles for revolutionising the way that urgent care for older people is delivered, focusing on how people receive the right care based on their needs and wishes. By changing the way services to older people are organised, we can improve their care and relieve the growing pressure on acute hospitals, so that they can focus on providing timely, high quality care for those who really need it. This means addressing issues across the system.

Eight key principles for improving urgent care for older people are identified in the report.  These principles have been influenced by innovative care models across the country, and conversations with senior leaders across the care system, clinical experts and carers.

Together the principles set out a vision for joined up, personalised and proactive care. This includes:

Always starting with care driven by the person’s needs and personal goals.

Care co-ordination that offers older people a single point of contact to guide them through an often complex system.
Prioritising proactive and preventive care so that the health and care system is not structured around “short-term” reactive fixes but instead long-term solutions for helping people to maintain their independence where possible. This includes encouraging social interaction to help people to stay well, and out of hospital.

Dr Mark Newbold, chair, Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older People said:

“We have talked too much in the past about integrating the providers of services and not enough about integrating care around people. It is the coordination of personal care for individuals that really matters. It is unacceptable to expect older people and carers to navigate a very complex system.

“Older people do need to access A&E at times, and the best hospitals tailor their service to meet their needs. But all too often, older people are forced to go to A&E because the alternative services that would help them be cared for at home are not available at the time they need them.

“We want to help people to stay well both mentally and physically and receive care that responds to care needs and personal wishes. Achieving this is better for both the individual and the wider care system.”

The report includes compelling evidence of the success of initiatives across the country that have improved care and reduced pressure on the health service but says this needs to happen nationally. Changing the health service from delivering short-term fixes for older people to helping them to keep well demands strong local leadership. We should back dynamic leaders to join up care while ensuring that outcome and performance measures allow local leaders to focus on individual needs, delivered by the whole health and care system.

The following innovative examples of integrated care were examined as part of the report:

By using a geriatric assessment team, Sheffield Teaching Hospital has cut down hospital stay days from 5.5 days to 1.1 days.
Introducing a care co-ordinator function commissioned by Age UK in Cornwall has resulted in a 31 per cent reduction in all hospital admissions and a 26 per cent reduction in non-elective admissions.
By providing a home based emergency assessment and treatment service, North East London Foundation Trust and London ambulance service have saved around £108,000 by avoiding ambulance trips and reducing the need for A&E admission and assessment.

You can download the full report below

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Balancing the Health Economy

Written: 20 January 2016

The government has signalled strong support for Simon Steven’s Five Year Forward View. The Autumn Statement promised NHS England an upfront cash injection of £3.8bn next year as part of £8bn extra funding over the next five years.  But big changes and new ways of thinking will be needed to deliver the new models of care Simon Steven’s has proposed.  The methods needed to balance the health economy may already be out there, can we identify them?  Steven Peak explores the issues and possible solutions raised in a recent conversation with six other NHS professionals. 

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Rapid tests sites chosen for new care model style primary care programme

Written: 17 December 2015

Fifteen 'rapid test sites' across England have been chosen to develop and test a new enhanced primary care approach - which is in line with the ambitions of the Five Year Forward View.

Almost 70 networks of GPs, health and social care staff submitted expressions of interest to be the first sites for the development of the Primary Care Home Model (PCH) - outlining their innovative ideas for transforming local health and community services.

The successful 15 were chosen following a rigorous process, involving key health and social care partners, patient representatives and an evaluation workshop attended by all shortlisted applicants. 

  • 1st Care Cumbria
  • Beacon Medical Group
  • Healthy East Grinstead Partnership
  • Larwood & Bawtry
  • Luton Primary Care Cluster
  • Nottingham North & East Community Alliance
  • Richmond
  • Rugeley Practices PCH
  • South Durham Health CIC
  • South Bristol Primary Care Collaborative
  • St Austell Healthcare
  • Thanet Central CIC
  • The Breckland Alliance
  • The Winsford Group
  • Wolverhampton Total Health Care

Launched at the NAPC's annual conference in October 2015, the programme strengthens and redesigns primary care around the health and social needs of local communities. For patients, it is aims to significantly improve the quality of patient centred care and their experience of local health services. They will be treated by single integrated and multidisciplinary teams, working to provide comprehensive and personalised care.

The principles of the PCH model are similar to the multispecialty community provider (MCP) - one of the Five Year Forward View types of vanguards, and learning and development will be supported by the new care models programme.

 

The main features are:

  • Provision of care to a defined, registered population of between 30,000 and 50,000
  • A combined focus on personalisation of care with improvements in population health outcomes 
  • An integrated workforce, with a strong focus on partnerships spanning primary, secondary and social care
  • Aligned clinical financial drivers through a unified, capitated budget with appropriately shared risks and rewards.

 

The NAPC will work in partnership with the rapid test sites to develop a structured support programme and share the learning more widely. It will be tailored to each rapid test site, but is likely to include peer support, facilitated workshops and networking events to:

  • support the development of rapid test site plans and identify support needs
  • jointly measure and evaluate progress of the rapid test sites, identifying evidence of what works to inform both their own and other networks ongoing development;
  • enable structured co-designed learning at a local and national level, so that all networks that expressed an interest in becoming a rapid test site can benefit.

Dr Nav Chana, Chair of NAPC said: "We have been delighted by the enthusiasm and large number of formal expressions of interest we received from networks wanting to become a rapid test site. All applicants demonstrated a very high level of desire and engagement from local partners to deliver the improvements in health and social care outcomes that the development of the PCH model enables. We now look forward to working not just with the 15 rapid test sites to support their development, but with all those who expressed an interest in the programme to learn and spread best practice so that we are able to see the benefits of the model across multiple locations."

 

Dr James Kingsland, President NAPC said: "Being able to announce the rapid test sites is a really exciting development in the future role of primary care in the NHS. The benefits of integrated care and multi-disciplinary team working to provide comprehensive and personalised care to individuals and populations are well recognised. However, it has been difficult to demonstrate sustainable community-based models within the NHS with measurable impact. Working in partnership with the rapid test sites and our wider community of interest, we believe this programme presents a unique opportunity for primary care to improve the quality of care provided to our registered patient populations and deliver better value for the NHS".

 

Phil McCarvill,  NHS Confederation Deputy Director of Policy said: "The NHS Confederation is committed to supporting ever greater partnership working between community and primary care.  The Primary Care Home 'rapid test sites' launched today build on the best attributes of both primary and community services to improve care for people in their communities. The opportunity to test and share evidence from the Primary Care Home model will be incredibly valuable in helping to understand how we can forge stronger partnerships between primary and community care."         

 

NHS England Chief Executive Simon Steven said: "The response to this new programme shows health professionals across primary care are committed to change and working in partnership. This will be another step towards greater integration between primary and secondary care and to providing personal population-orientated primary care where physical, mental and social care is integrated around the needs of communities, particularly older frail people with long term conditions. This will complement the delivery of the vanguards."

 

Christine Morgan, Coalition for Collaborative Care said: "I was pleased to be involved in the evaluation of the NAPC Primary Care Home test sites as one of four coproduction members of the Coalition for Collaborative Care (C4CC). The proposed test sites were ambitious in their proposals for integrated care and understood the need to work in partnership with patients and carers to achieve person-centred care and outcomes.  If the test sites are successful, their continued work should make a positive difference to people in the communities they serve, including carers and people like me with long-term conditions." 

 

 

Notes to Editors:

NAPC and the NHS Confederation with additional support and learning from the New Care Models Programme will deliver the Primary Care Home model. NAPC have prepared the Primary Care Home model paper and an accompanying set of FAQs. To download these documents and/or to register an interest in developing the PCH model, please visit  www.napc.co.uk/primary-care-home or contact  napc@napc.co.uk 

 

About Coalition for Collaborative Care:

The Coalition for Collaborative Care (C4CC) was officially launched on 21 November 2014 and is an innovative alliance of some of the health, social care, community and charitable sectors most influential groups and organisations.

The Coalition has the simple belief that people are in charge of their own lives, and should be the main decision makers about the care and support they receive, and how they manage their conditions. It is not just about educating the health system, it is about enabling people to express their own needs and decide their own priorities, in partnership with their healthcare professional.

 www.coalitionforcollaborativecare.org.uk

  

 

Press Statement: Call for formal EoIs for new care model style primary care programme

Written: 13 November 2015

National Association of Primary Care

Press Statement Release 13th November 2015

Formal expressions of interest sought - new care model style primary care programme

 

The National Association of Primary Care is now seeking formal expressions of interest from organisations wanting to become rapid test sites for a new innovative programme which enhances primary care in line with the NHS Five Year Forward View.

 

Launched at the NAPC’s annual conference in October 2015, the new care model style programme offers a new approach to strengthening and redesigning primary care centred around the health and social needs of local communities.

 

The programme develops the NAPC’s primary care home model and has been endorsed by NHS England with principles aligned to multispecialty community provider (MCP), one of the types of new care model vanguards.

 

The main features are:

- provision of care to a defined, registered population of between 30,000 and 50,000;
- aligned clinical financial drivers through a unified, capitated budget with appropriate shared risks and rewards;
- an integrated workforce, with a strong focus on partnerships spanning primary, secondary and social care; and
- a combined focus on personalisation of care with improvements in population health outcomes.

The formal Expression of Interest documentation and timetable can be downloaded via: www.napc.co.uk/primary-care-home

 

Dr Nav Chana, Chair NAPC said:

“We have received positive responses to date from colleagues registering early interest to be part of this new care model style primary care programme.  This next phase is to seek formal responses from those where the conditions are closest to demonstrating elements of the model. This is not an exclusive process, and we hope to spread and support other sites with the learning from the rapid test sites”.

 

Dr James Kingsland, President NAPC said:

“This marks a significant step in the development process of the Primary Care Home model as a form of multispecialty community provider. Our intent is to work with rapid test sites in a way that develops new and replicable approaches that support the population health outcomes.”

 

Dr Johnny Marshall, policy director of the NHS Confederation, said:

“Testing the Primary Care Home model is an important step in improving partnerships between community health services and primary care, so we strongly encourage organisations to take part in this project. These new models locally help to break down the traditional boundaries between primary care, community health services, social care and the voluntary sector to better meet people's needs. If we can get primary care right, we can improve the delivery of care for patients right across the NHS - enabling hospitals to do what they do best. Our Community Health Services Forum will continue working with the NAPC to take this project forward.”

 

The NAPC and the NHS Confederation with additional support and learning from the New Care Models Programme will deliver the Primary Care Home model. NAPC have prepared the Primary Care Home model paper and an accompanying set of FAQs.

 

To download these documents and/or to register early interest in becoming a PCH, please visit www.napc.co.uk/primary-care-home or contact napc@napc.co.uk 

020 7636 7228.

 

 

ENDS

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Press Statement: New care model style primary care programme launched to transform care

Written: 23 October 2015

The National Association of Primary Care

Embargoed release: Thursday 22 October 2015 – 00:15

New care model style primary care programme launched to transform care

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) has today announced the launch of a new programme to support the strengthening of primary care in line with the new care models outlined in the NHS Five Year Forward View.

Endorsed by NHS England, the new programme builds on NAPC’s Primary Care Home initiative and is tailored to meet the health and social needs of a community of up to 50,000 improving their health, wellbeing and care.

Care will be provided by ‘a complete clinical community’, an integrated workforce from hospitals, primary care, community health services, social care and the voluntary sector.  

Patients will be offered more personalised, coordinated and responsive care nearer to their home. There will be improved care for people with long term conditions and patients needing rehabilitation.

Expressions of interest for potential rapid test sites will be announced by the NAPC in the next few weeks.

NHS England Chief Executive Simon Stevens, who will endorse the programme during his speech via video link to the annual NAPC conference today, said: “This programme offers an innovative approach to strengthening and redesigning primary care, centred around the needs of local communities, and tapping into the expertise of a wide array of health professionals”.

The key features will be: 

- provision of care to a defined, registered population of between 30,000 and 50,000;
- aligned clinical financial drivers through a unified, capitated budget with appropriate shared risks and rewards;
- an integrated workforce, with a strong focus on partnerships spanning primary, secondary and social care; and
- a combined focus on personalisation of care with improvements in population health outcomes.

Dr Nav Chana, Chair NAPC said,

“In essence what we are describing is the "home" of care for a population with a tailored workforce with access to the data, tools and resources to provide high quality comprehensive care.  Working at this scale ensures a functional team where everyone knows each other and there is a true sense of belonging for patients, the population and the workforce."

Dr James Kingsland OBE, President NAPC said,

“We want to have a strong evidence base behind us, rather than just individual or collective opinion.  The Primary Care Home is about building from the registered list, which has served the NHS so well and recognises patients access the NHS through general practice.  This new model of care will be more ambitious in the delivery of first contact.”

The programme will be delivered by the NAPC and the NHS Confederation with additional support and learning from the new care models programme.

The NAPC have prepared the Primary Care Home paper and an accompanying set of FAQs.

To download these documents and/or to register early interest in becoming a PCH, please visit www.napc.co.uk/primary-care-home or contact napc@napc.co.uk  020 7636 7228

 

 

ENDS

National Primary Care Network report - Developing a successful Multispecialty Community Provider

Written: 5 October 2015

The National Primary Care Network (NPCN) is a group of over 500 healthcare professionals from across primary care including GPs, nurses, dentists, optometrists and pharmacists. It holds a quarterly meeting for around 50 participants from which a report is produced. This is the latest in the series.

This year, the NPCN is delighted to receive the support of Microsoft.

This report by Closer Still Media reporter Ailsa Colquhoun is intended as a record of a daytime meeting held on 24th June 2015 at London ExCel during the annual Health + Care and Commissioning event organised by Closer Still Media. The theme of this meeting was ‘Developing the components of a successful Multispecialty community Provider’ and it comprised a thought-provoking introduction to the topic provided by Dr James Kingsland OBE – the NPCN’s Chair, and a presentation by Louise Watson, NHS England National MCP Programme Lead, New Models of Care team, who provided an update on NHS England’s ‘vanguard’ sites. These are supporting the improvement and integration of services as part of NHS England’s delivery of the Five Year Forward View. 

During the meeting, participants divided themselves into discussion groups to discuss three specific aspects of the MCP model of care, and the results of these discussions are also presented in this report on pages 3-5. The discussion topics were:
• Risks and rewards of locally managed capitated budgets
• Integrated workforce modelling
• Developing population health outcomes.

CloserStill Media, the business media company which puts on Health + Care and
Commissioning, the largest event for health and social care professionals, supports the
NPCN financially but has no input in the NPCN’s discussions.
 

You can download the full report below.

 

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Press Statement: Comment on PM: We will deliver 7-day GP services by 2020

Written: 5 October 2015

The National Association of Primary Care Press Statement:

PRIME MINISTER: WE WILL DELIVER 7-DAY GP SERVICES BY 2020

Commenting on the announcement about the proposed new seven day GP contract made by the Prime Minister yesterday, Chairman, Dr Nav Chana said "We are supportive of the announcement made explicitly around new and innovative approaches for contracting primary care. We are supportive of the direction of travel as it aligns with our thinking around the Primary Care Home (PCH)."

Vice Chairman, NAPC Dr Minesh Patel, said "The PCH is a model of care that provides both personalised care and population health management and is consistent with the Prime Minister's announcement. The PCH puts local populations at its core delivery and truly liberates primary care in its widest sense to deliver services over a seven day week at times of greatest need.

President, Dr James Kingsland, OBE said, "working across historical organisational boundaries with a re-engineered workforce meeting the needs of populations of between 30,000 and 50,000 are key elements of the PCH. This exciting development may just be the tonic that the NHS needs to remain vibrant and viable for generations to come.

The NAPC also runs the National Primary Care Network which has been working on an implementation programme for the Primary Care Home. Recent reports can be accessed here and here.

ENDS 

 

For further information, please contact: napc@napc.co.uk

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Primary care in the NHS: Busting the myths

Written: 20 August 2015

The National Association of Primary Care have teamed up with NHS Confederation to create their third myth buster.

This instalment talks about common misconceptions and myths surrounding Primary Care.

You can download this below.

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Press Statement: RPS & the NAPC Consultation Document

Written: 12 August 2015

National Association of Primary Care

For immediate release - 12th August 2015

Royal Pharmaceutical Society and the National Association of Primary Care consult on integration of General Practice and Community Pharmacy

Radical proposals concerning how community pharmacy and general practice could work better together have been jointly announced today by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and the National Association of Primary Care.

The two organisations believe the current pressures in primary care access, coupled with increasing demand and the squeeze on finances mean the time is right to think differently about how NHS primary care provision could better meet the needs of patients and the public.

The proposals include:

- To develop potential schemes and programmes that could increase collaboration between general practitioners and community pharmacists including:

- To consider community pharmacy as an NHS access point for minor self-limiting conditions

- To make sure pharmacists and GP’s prioritise support patients at high risk of a serious health problem, such as frail older people or those with multiple long term conditions

- To encourage patient lead access to health records by community pharmacy

- To use the opportunity of pharmacists directly employed by general practice to link in with community pharmacy

- To develop an underlying approach that aligns financial incentives for community pharmacies and general practices to work together, a new "Joint Population Health Framework"

 

Dr Nav Chana, Chair of the NAPC said

“It’s very encouraging that the focus on greater collaboration between community pharmacy and general practice has been recognised. This is an important enabler for a transformed primary care system that NAPC has supported within its 7-Point Plan for primary care.
The opportunities for greater collaboration could have a big impact on the workload pressure for general practice and hence the importance of this consultation at this time!”

Ash Soni RPS President and NAPC Board member said

“For too long community pharmacy has been straightjacketed with a top down contract that doesn’t allow practitioners like me to redesign our local services in line with the population’s needs. It’s time to end the one size fits all approach and allow services be designed around the needs of patients and the public rather than healthcare providers. Working with the NAPC we are suggesting that there is a different way of approaching healthcare, where skills and access are designed to meet patient demand. The NHS is looking for new models of care, I believe that we can either be part of the change and look to an enhanced role or stay as we are and risk being marginalised. More importantly the NHS will miss an opportunity to re- purpose resources which lead to better healthcare services to the public.”

Sandra Gidley RPS Board Chair added

“People have been critical of the English Pharmacy Board programme around pharmacists and GPs, saying we haven’t done enough to promote the potential for community pharmacy and general practice to work together. However this means pharmacy will need to accept change, and I know this is tough, we’re working incredibly hard just to stand still. If we are to move away from the treadmill of dispensing to a role where our clinical skills are recognised and valued by the public then the payment structures we currently work under will need to change. These proposals are designed to test the appetite for that, do we want to stay as we are or do we want a different role in the reformed NHS. Now it’s over to GPs, pharmacists and users of NHS services to let us know what you think.”

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) and the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) are listening to stakeholders from across pharmacy, general practice, the wider NHS and, most importantly, people who use and rely on the NHS, to consider how better integration of the roles of the community pharmacist and general practitioner can improve patient care.

The consultation closes on 9th October 2015.

Please read the consultation document and respond using this consultation response form.

All responsesmust be emailed to Heidi.Wright@rpharms.com

 

ENDS

 

Notes to editors:

This short consultation will lead to the production of policy and ideas that will inform policy makers, commissioners and NHS care providers about the potential benefits of greater integration of the work of community pharmacists and general practitioners and how this can be implemented at national and local levels.

Responses to this consultation will be collated and form the basis of a formal report to raise interest, stimulate debate and press for beneficial changes in primary care.

We are also actively looking for case studies that demonstrate real life examples of where joined-up general practice and community pharmacy services are already benefitting patients.

Please send all replies and case studies to Heidi Wright, Royal Pharmaceutical Society email at: Heidi.Wright@rpharms.com.

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.  Find out more at www.napc.co.uk

 

For more information on the NAPC, please contact:

Email:  napc@napc.co.uk

Web:  www.napc.co.uk

Tel: 020 7636 7228

Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care

Lettsom House 11 Chandos Street

London W1G 9DP

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The art of the possible. What role for community health services in reshaping care?

Written: 21 July 2015

This discussion paper is for commissioners and providers developing new care models in response to NHS England’s Five Year Forward View. It offers early thinking on how community health services can add value to emerging new models, aiming to stimulate further debate about their role at the heart of integrated, community-based care.

Key Points

• The vision for better and more sustainable care by 2020 rests on community-based models that are coordinated around people’s needs. Making the most of community health services will be critical for success.

• Community services’ focus on whole-person care makes them ideally placed to help lead and deliver new care models.

• Community health and primary care are natural partners. Deepening this relationship can combine the strengths of both in a communitybased offer that increasingly looks like a single service to the people who use it. Practical
support from community health services could enable primary care to work at much larger scale more quickly.

• Community services are well placed to enable better ways for specialists and generalists to work together, support self-management, and develop the community and voluntary sector partnerships crucial for prevention
and wellbeing.

• Care models need to use innovations found across community health services – including smaller social enterprise, private and voluntary sector providers.

• Evidence of local population needs, and insights from staff and patients, must drive new care models, instead of starting with organisational structures.

• A strategic approach to maximising the value of community health services is needed, locally and nationally. Policy barriers must be resolved as soon as possible if we are to see a step change in community-based care.

 

 

 

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NAPC Statement: Navigation and Support for Dementia Patients and their Carers.

Written: 7 July 2015

For immediate release - 7th July 2015

Navigation and Support for Dementia Patients and their Carers. The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Launches the Primary Care Navigator Independent Evaluation.

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) through its Innovation Programme has been supporting colleagues across the breadth of Primary Care to look beyond a pure medical interventions approach to addressing patient needs but to include a focus on wellbeing and proactive prevention. 

The expert consensus is that when it comes to dealing with the needs of patients and carers with signs of cognitive problems or a diagnosis of dementia, primary care providers often find themselves lacking confidence and knowledge about what information and practical support might be suitable or, indeed available, particularly at a local level.

Building on the successful Health Education England's (HEE) progress on awareness raising, in terms of knowledge, skills and attitudes for all those working in health and care, The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) established the role of the Primary Care Navigator (PCN), providing e-learning, classroom training and mentoring for nominees from an initial group of 20 GP practices and 20 community pharmacies. The aim of this pilot was to learn how to support practices and pharmacies to increase synergies in addressing local health population priorities to find and use the resources available when dealing with dementia. Resources readily available for patients, carers and families.

By training front line non-clinical staff, who already deal with patients and carers on a day-to-day basis, to act as PCNs, and by providing up to date localised navigation tools, the PCN is empowering people to “pull” the integrated help and support they need from all sectors to encourage a more effective self-management approach.

Sally Kitt, NAPC COO said “The PCN does not ‘fix people's problems’, or duplicate other roles that are already established, but they direct patients and carers to the wealth of support that is already out there in order to empower them stay out of crisis and increase wellbeing whatever their conditions.”

The programme ran from June 2014 to February 2015 with baseline and end of project measurements taken to assess the impact and uptake of the PCN role. Measureable positive impact was seen from raising awareness and understanding within the Primary Care setting as providers developed new connections and worked collaboratively. Patient feedback and experience improved as PCNs were able to listen and discover what their patients and carers really needed in terms of their own self-care, lifestyle and wellbeing.

A strong focus for this project was to understand the elements that would enable sustainability and scalability of such a role. The report highlights the learning gathered in terms of the barriers and enablers to making Primary Care Navigators an integral role in local service provision, not just from the perspective of an innovation project but from those doing and continuing the role as illustrated in the two mentioned case studies.

Dr Nav Chana, NAPC Chairman said “I commend this report in the light of the recent survey undertaken by the Alzheimer’s Society.  NAPC see the Primary Care Navigator role as central in not only assisting colleagues in General Practice and Primary Care and the demands they face but more importantly as part of the solution in giving the vital support needed for those with Dementia.”

What next? The NAPC have expanded the Primary Care Navigator role piloting a further project which will the skills of Health Champions in Lambeth to act as PCNs for diabetes. The NAPC are committed to the PCN role already proving its value in the area of dementia and diabetes with a vision to extend this role nationally across all long-term conditions.

 

ENDS

The full Deloitte report on NAPC Primary Care Navigators can be downloaded below.

Notes to editors:

 

1.   The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.  Find out more at www.napc.co.uk
2.   For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

 

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Primary Care Navigator training programme for Dementia

Written: 22 June 2015

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Launches Primary Care Navigator Independent Evaluation.

The expert consensus is that when it comes to dealing with the needs of patients and carers with signs of cognitive problems or a diagnosis of dementia, primary care providers often find themselves lacking confidence and knowledge about what information and practical support might be suitable or, indeed, available.

In response, and building on the successful Health Education England’s (HEE) progress on Tier 1 (awareness raising, in terms of knowledge, skills and attitudes for all those working in health and care) The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) provided an e-learning, classroom and on the job training for nominees from an initial group of 20 GP practices and 20 community pharmacies, as a pilot learning process. This provided a platform for transition into HEE’s Tier 2 (knowledge, skills and attitudes for roles that have regular contact with people living with dementia).

Following training in June and July 2014, the role of the Primary Care Navigator has been developed, trained and implemented in a number of geographic locations across England, covering both GP practices and pharmacies. PCNs and their supervisors have received site visits and mentor support in the period following their training up until the data collection period in February 2015. Learning from these visits has been shared with all participants as we have together built an understanding of the barriers and enablers to making the PCN role an integral part of local service provision.

The culmination of this project is presented via the independent evaluation of its impact by Deloitte LLP will be launched at NHS Confederation Conference on Wednesday 3rd June 2015 at ACC Liverpool. 90 patients and carers reported ability to find support increased 34% as a result of this role in pharmacies and GP Practices

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New Deal for General Practice

Written: 19 June 2015

New Deal for General Practice

Immediate release - 19th June 2015

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) welcomes the Secretary of State for Health’s announcement today on his commitment to increasing investment for primary care in the new deal for General Practice. We also welcome the recognition of developing the primary care workforce and its importance to the future of the NHS.

Primary Care remains the first point of contact most of us have with our health care system and, as a member organisation representing the breadth of primary care, NAPC welcomes the initiatives to design and develop this workforce.

Dr Nav Chana, Chairman of the NAPC said:

“This approach to workforce development in primary care must be focused on building teams with the right skills needed to address local population care needs as well as addressing shortages in GP numbers.

We recognise the importance of improving access to primary care across 7 days, however, we need to ensure we first get the system right "in hours" and build on the evidence around patient access to avoid falling in the trap of supply induced demand. In addition there are more solutions to be explored for providing a 7-day service.”

NAPC also welcomes the approach to reviewing outcomes for patient groups but wish to ensure that these include an emphasis on outcomes that matter to people including wellness, prevention and self-care as well as those related to illness.

Dr James Kingsland, President of NAPC said:

“We welcome the Secretary of State’s commitment to reducing bureaucracy and support technological innovations that will enable professionals to spend more time with their patients. Clinicians must be liberated from over burdensome administrative work which deflects from patient care ”

As an organisation at the forefront of defining and testing new models of working through its Primary Care Innovation Network (PIN) and the National Association of Provider Organisations (NAPO), NAPC will continue to encourage and empower primary care to try new things to improve the health and wellbeing of local people.

 

Press Statement : The Royal College of Emergency Medicine

Written: 20 May 2015

Formation of a new Government

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine looks forward to working with the new government to solve the challenges facing emergency care, and to ensure a safe and reliable A&E service for patients as measured by the four hour target.

At the College, we wish to be clear and constructive at all times. To this end, we launched our STEP campaign in November 2014 which explains what needs to be done to tackle the challenges facing A&Es. Focusing on the need for Sustainable Staffing, Tariff and Contract reform, Exit Block eradication and Primary Care Co-location, the campaign has received wide endorsement from other bodies and politicians.

This summary document explains the four aspects of the College’s STEP campaign. Implementing the four components of the campaign should be a priority for the new government.
RCEM President, Dr Cliff Mann, said:

“The challenges facing A&E services will become apparent again all too soon during the coming winter. We believe it is in everyone’s interests to urgently implement the recommendations of the STEP campaign.”

“Resolving the challenges facing emergency medicine and A&E departments need not be difficult, nor indeed do we think they will require more money. In fact the reverse is true. Much of the STEP campaign could be accomplished within two to three years and would result in a system that has greater capacity and lower costs.”

-Ends-

Contact

For further information, or to speak with a spokesperson for The Royal College of Emergency Medicine, please contact Matt Chorley at matt.chorley@rcem.ac.uk or on 0207 067 1275.
About the Royal College of Emergency Medicine The Royal College of Emergency Medicine is the single authoritative body for Emergency Medicine in the UK. Emergency Medicine is the medical specialty which provides doctors and consultants to A&E departments in the NHS in the UK and other healthcare systems across the world.
The Royal College works to ensure high quality care by setting and monitoring standards of care, and providing expert guidance and advice on policy to relevant bodies on matters relating to Emergency Medicine.

The Royal College has over 5,000 fellows and members, who are doctors and consultants in emergency departments working in the health services in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and across the world.

Press Statement: Response to Prime Ministers Speech

Written: 18 May 2015

For immediate release – 18th May 2015

The NAPC listened with great interest to the Prime Ministers first major speech since returning to No. 10. In response to David Cameron’s pre-election commitment to increase budgets by at least £8 billion by 2020 and create “seven-day” health service, The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) reiterates the need for integrated working across primary care and beyond and states that primary care is the best possible place to deliver high quality care closer to home.

Dr Nav Chana, Chairman of NAPC citing a recent publication on Workforce Planning “Any increase in the number of GPs must be accompanied by more sophisticated approaches to recruitment and retention, as well as a fundamental review of the model of care in which GPs operate.” 

Dr Chana went on to say “Primary care organised around general practice has a pivotal role to play but it must be transformed to face challenges.”

The National Association of Primary care working with and supporting members across the country understand the importance of Primary Care as being 97% of first contact verses 8% of budget based on tariffs, reimbursement and contracts. 

Dr James Kingsland, OBE, President of NAPC said “NAPC has led the charge on behalf of members to work collaboratively across the NHS spectrum putting people and not diseases at the heart of service delivery.” 

Dr Nikita Kanani, Honorary Secretary, NAPC said “NAPC is working with members around demonstrating and implementation of the Five Year Forward View and New Models of Care. We have spoken with numerous members that are doing extraordinary things in their communities and are already providing seven-day access and beyond.”

The NAPC also welcomes the focus of the quality of mental health services as it time and time again emphasises the central role these play in many of its innovation projects working directly with primary care front line.

Dr Nav Chana said "Our Primary Care Innovation Projects have an importance on real health outcomes related to self-care, self-management and patient activation where the patient’s mental state and support network is key. They prove behavioral change is hard not just for the health professional but also for the patient but we believe it's at he heart of rethinking what Primary care can be”

 

Ends

For further information, please contact: napc@napc.co.uk

Party Manifestos 2015 Comparative analysis

Written: 22 April 2015

NHS Confederation response to the manifestos

“The NHS is facing some of the biggest service and financial challenges in its history. If we are to tackle them, local leaders will need to be given the backing to work with their local communities to transform care.

“Manifesto commitments will need to be backed by concrete action from the next Government – rhetoric can never be a substitute for reality when it comes to patient care. I am pleased with the impact the 2015 Challenge Prescription for the Election, which the NHS Confederation and 22 other leading health and care organisations produced, has had. Many of the parties’ proposals back reductions in preventable illness. There has been an increased focus on achieving parity of esteem between mental and physical health from the parties.

“There are welcome improvements and commitments signalled by the parties. There are also still a number of issues which are not addressed and which must be priorities for whoever forms the next Government”.


Rob Webster, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, 16 April 2015

 

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Rip off the sticking plaster now

Written: 22 April 2015

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Read the Case Study by Deloitte LLP: Two examples of engaged PCNs for Dementia

Written: 1 April 2015

Background

From June 2014 to February 2015, the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Practice Innovation Network (PIN) together with Health Education England (HEE) has been responsible for developing and running a pilot “Primary Care Navigators (PCN) for Dementia” training programme.  In order to have an objective understanding of the impact of this pilot, NAPC contracted Deloitte LLP and its research hub, the Centre for Health Solutions, to undertake:

A formal evaluation of the new training programme and the effectiveness of the PCN role;
An analysis of its impact upon patient outcomes, GP practice outcomes and the lessons learnt; and
An evaluation of two case studies that the NAPC identified as the two most engaged participants (as judged by its rolling evaluation) to illustrate the impact that full engagement can have on outcomes.

The case study report is an evaluation of the two case examples identified as being most engaged by NAPC. It presents a qualitative assessment of the two sites, based on visits and high level data and feedback received.  A full report, following an evaluation of all participants of the training programme, will be undertaken by the end of April 2015. 

The full report can be downloaded below.

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NAPC response to 350 Million Investment in Primary Care

Written: 27 March 2015

The National Association of Primary Care welcomes the announcement made today by NHS England that patients across England are set to benefit from a £350 million investment in GP Services.

NAPC stated when the Prime Minister’s Challenge Fund was launched in 2014 that the funding for pilots to improve access to GP services would provide the much needed opportunities to test and evaluate different models of primary care delivery through a more creative and innovative approach.

This view has not changed, Dr Nav Chana, NAPC Chairman said today:

“In order to make a real difference to the health of our communities, we must have the means and the will to build collaborative networks, embrace technology better and recognise the need to develop a different skill mix within and across primary care teams.

Dr Chana, went on to say “We welcome the announcement from NHSE today identifying the Prime Minister's Challenge Fund second wave pilots and the general practices who will receive the first tranche of the investment fund for primary care infrastructure. This additional funding represents a step in the right direction towards creating the capacity for transformational change within primary care. It's also pleasing to hear about the focus on innovation and workforce modeling in many of the bids, which resonate with NAPC's 7-point plan."

You can view NHS Englands letter below.

Ends

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PRESS STATEMENT 12 MARCH 2015 Leicester Hospitals' campaign: Everybody counts

Written: 12 March 2015

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine is pleased to support and publicise Leicester Hospitals' campaign and video, Everybody Counts: Improving patient flow through our hospitals. 

The emergency department at the Leicester Royal Infirmary is one of the busiest in the UK, and the campaign focusses on the serious issue of ‘Exit Block’. Exit Block is where emergency departments can’t transfer patients to hospital inpatient beds.
Over 500,000 patients in the UK are affected by Exit Block every year, and we know that where Exit Block occurs, patient mortality increases. The campaign to improve patient flow through emergency departments
encourages all healthcare professionals to consider what part they can play in alleviating the problem of overcrowding and Exit Block. 

To watch Leicester Hospitals’ video, and for more information on the campaign, please click here.
The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has publicly drawn attention to the problems of overcrowding and Exit Block in departments. Details of our Exit Block campaign, including our recent February 2015 paper on the problem, can be found here.


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Press Release - Response to vanguard site announcement

Written: 10 March 2015

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) welcomes the much awaited announcement from NHS England on who the first Vanguard sites are and the models of care that will developed with the £200 million funding.

This presents a great opportunity to develop fit for purpose care models to demonstrate the aspirations set out in the Five Year Forward. NAPC is keen to support the spread of excellent practice, recognising  there will be a great number of sites not chosen which are also able to transform patient care.

Dr Nav Chana, Chairman of NAPC said:

"This is a real opportunity to develop care models and transform the workforce so that the focus is on improving outcomes to populations. Demonstrating the value of an empowered and appropriately resourced primary care system must be key to these models of care."

James Kingsland OBE, Senior Responsible Officer for NAPC’s National Association of Provider Organisation said:

"This is timely and expected news following our NAPO meeting with guest speakers, Ian Dodge, National Director for Commissioning Strategy and Sir Sam Everington, National GP Advisor where new models of care was the primary topic. NAPC’s keen to support all sites but particularly those unsuccessful Vanguard bidders by providing a ‘home’ within the NAPC’s NAPO. We have a real drive to spread the learning and best practice from the Vanguard process to sites who have not chosen to be part of this first stage through connectivity and mentoring within our networks thereby providing consistency and comparability.”

Press Statement - NPCN, New Models of Care Report

Written: 10 March 2015

The National Association of Primary Care, having confirmed that the National Primary Care Network (NPCN) will be hosted and supported by NAPC, held their quarterly meeting in London last week.  Attended by national clinical leaders representing the breadth of primary care, there was unanimous support for the NPCN to be part of the wider "stronger together" programme being led by the NAPC.  CloserStill Media is to act as publishing partner.

Addressing the meeting, Samantha Jones, Director of New Models of Care, NHSE,  just four weeks in post, admitted ‘feeling a range of emotions ' as she read through 269 expressions of interest to become Vanguard sites.  The attached report "New Models of Care" produced in partnership with CloserStill, is the collective output from the meeting, with specific advice to ensure the success of the New Models of Care.

Dr Nav Chana, Chairman of NAPC said "I commend this report and the solutions put forward.  New Models of Care form an important part of NAPC's work inline with the Association's 7 Point Plan."

Dr James Kingsland OBE, Chair of NPCN and President of NAPC said "I am delighted that the thought leadership and publications of the NPCN will continue and be supported by NAPC. 

You can download the full report below.

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Ignoring the prescription?

Written: 4 March 2015

Ignoring the prescription?

‘Acute and emergency care – prescribing the remedy’

Foreword
This report represents a comprehensive assessment of the impact or otherwise of the recommendations published last summer, 'Acute and emergency care - prescribing the remedy'. These recommendations were collectively and uniquely endorsed by the Royal College of Surgeons, the Royal College of Physicians, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the College of Emergency Medicine. They were welcomed by the NHS Confederation. There is no point in making recommendations if they are not acted upon. As the winter of 2014/15 draws to a close it is timely to make assessment of the extent to which the recommendations have
been adopted.
The findings make sobering reading. In almost all cases a majority of commissioners, providers and systems have not acted upon the collective recommendations of the aforementioned medical royal colleges or the endorsement of the NHS Confederation. Additionally we sought to determine the impact in England of the £700 million allocated by the Department of Health to Local Resilience Groups to relieve the pressures on the acute care system. Our survey demonstrates that a derisory proportion of 'targeted' funds have been assigned to
emergency departments. As a consequence of 'ignoring the prescription’ and failure to invest available funds in proven, frontline strategies it cannot be a coincidence that the NHS has faced the four of the most challenging months ever, during which there have been unacceptable levels of system performance with directly harmful effects on patients and frontline staff.

 

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PRESS STATEMENT - Ignoring the prescription?

Written: 4 March 2015

PRESS STATEMENT – Ignoring the prescription?

In the Spring of 2014 four Medical Royal Colleges and many other organisations met to discuss how to make the urgent and emergency care system more resilient. Their report 'Acute and emergency care - prescribing the remedy' was published in June and was welcomed by the NHS confederation and the Department of Health in England.

After the winter of 2014/15, in which there was unanimous recognition of unprecedented pressures, the Royal College of Emergency Medicine surveyed the doctors in charge of Emergency Departments in all four nations of the UK.

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine today announces the results of this survey revealing just how much needs to be done to address the challenges facing Emergency Departments (A&Es). The survey of clinical leaders in Emergency Medicine across the UK was responded to by 142 clinical leaders in January 2015. It therefore represents almost two thirds of the UK Emergency Departments.

The findings of this survey have informed the follow up report 'Ignoring the Prescription'. This report highlights that although there are examples of full implementation of all of the original recommendations, the implementation is inconsistent and in most cases most systems have not implemented most of the recommendations.

In addition we surveyed the department leads in England to ascertain what proportion of the £700 million allocated by the government was spent on staff or other resources in their emergency departments. The reported figure is a staggering one percent!

The College concludes that a combination of failure to implement consensus recommendations coupled with the failure to invest allocated monies in front line services has led to extraordinary winter pressures which were largely avoidable.

These results present a stark picture of what still needs to be done to implement the findings of the Prescribing the Remedy report issued last year. When the report was issued we knew that the solutions would take time to implement, but the scale of the gap is worrying. The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has prioritised the immediate needs into its STEP Campaign and calls upon all political parties to sign up to this and state that they will prioritise the implementation of the four STEPs once the new government is in place.

Dr Clifford Mann, President of the College said: “Throughout the past 18 months we have been working closely with the Department of Health on the challenges facing A&Es over the winter months. It is so disappointing that our survey shows that the significant investment the government made to tackle the winter pressures has not reached the A&Es it was supposed to help.
This report is an indictment of current decision making and investment in acute and emergency care. Patients and frontline staff deserve better and will be incredulous at the failure to adopt best practice and squander money on admission avoidance schemes that have self-evidently failed. This report should act as a catalyst to ensure the same mistakes are not made in 2015. In future it would make much more sense to release funding directly to hospitals for investment in A&Es. Rather than make this an annual winter crisis ritual, long term funding should be targeted on A&Es which will enable Emergency Medicine Clinical Directors to make lasting improvements in patient care.”

-Ends-

 

 

Good Doctor or Bad?

Written: 25 February 2015

As I sign another prescription for a statin for Edna, I have to ask whether this is good medicine. She’s an 88 year old on six other medications giving a total daily ingestion of ten powerful tablets. Am I treating my patient or adhering in mistaken trust to hopelessly inexact and flawed ‘best practice’ guidelines? Is this best treatment from Edna’s perspective alone, or am I a public health physician focused on population health regardless of an individual’s chance of benefit? Worse still, am I just protecting my own reputation from accusations of ageism and taking the least contentious position for fear of challenge, adhering to unquestioning peer behaviour? Worse again, am I treating her to meet my QOF targets or, arguably worst of all, has our whole profession simply been duped by the sophisticated and subliminal marketing of a rampant pharmaceutical industry to the detriment of the individual and the taxpayer? I find myself increasingly uneasy and concerned that I may be doing more harm than good, yet uncertain that I can justify non-conformity to my peers. What’s worrying me so much?

Firstly, I’ve lost confidence in the evidence. Clinical trials are designed by pharmaceutical companies in a way that maximises the chance of demonstrating a positive result. As illustration, one study chose FBG rather than HbA1c as the primary end-point, which was known by the company to be more likely to demonstrate significance - this has been well demonstrated in other trials. Reputations and future funding of researchers themselves hang in the balance on the ‘success’ of a trial. Results that support prescribing are publicised with exaggerated optimism, and even recently it is clear that adverse data is deliberately suppressed by companies or exacted only under extreme duress.  So I don’t trust the data and fear what evidence we do have is skewed in favour of pharmacological intervention – but I can’t prove it.

Secondly, trial exclusion criteria select out Edna and all similar to her on the basis of age and comorbidities – even though the ‘evidence’ from those same trials is then magically extrapolated to prove that, despite being 20-30 years older than any trial participant, it’s applicable and she should be treated. Indeed, very few of the seminal studies recruit patients anywhere near this age or with the complexity of conditions she has. So we are working in an evidence-free zone and compiling ‘guidelines’ instead. Yet one set of guidelines on one of her conditions conflicts hopelessly with another set to be applied to her with equal vigour - both sets have been compiled in their own specialist silos. It’s now acknowledged that some 60% of the studies NICE uses are not applicable to primary care. I fear that these guidelines are not refined enough, are not cognisant of the complexities of her case, do not reflect the chance of her benefitting individually, and are therefore not appropriate – yet are being systematically used as a performance management and incentivisation tool. I’d like to override them and use some good old clinical acumen as I think I might do her more good – but I can’t prove it.

Thirdly, we are medicalising more and more of our population. Great for numbers of specialists and further subspecialisation but are we doing the patient good? How does it happen? By progressively tightening diagnostic criteria, of course! If, for example, a patient’s GFR should be 100% at the age of forty and decline by 1% per annum then simple mathematics dictates that maximum normal GFR at the age of 88 is 52 – but this automatically labels her as having CKD. In my practice the prevalence of ‘CKD’ at her age is now 60%. Can it be right to label the majority of the elderly as ill rather than just accept a decline in renal reserve as normal senescence? And we’re getting better at it - with a new diagnostic criterion for diabetes based on a low HbA1c, we’re set to pull many more people into the diabetic net; new ultrasensitive troponin markers augment myocardial infarction diagnosis! Etc., etc. We have to challenge this. After all, labelling itself has sequelae; there is considerable psychological and iatrogenic morbidity. And all this monitoring +/- intervention comes with a high workload and resource commitment. Is it all likely to be of benefit? Has a cost-benefit analysis been done to see what return there is on the total resource committed? Has there been proper consideration of the distraction and loss of focus this brings away from those who would benefit from more intensive attention? Certainly General Practice resource is finite and under intense pressure. There must be a trade off between diagnostic purity and allowing people to live their lives free of the shackles of labelling and medicalisation. I fear we’re undermining people’s self-confidence and independence by labelling them as ‘ill’, without being sure that pinning diagnostic labels to them at very early stage disease is more than compensated by a reduction in other morbidities – but I can’t prove it.

Fourthly, positive trial endpoints are based on significance and related back to numbers needed to treat (NNT). Even naively assuming the trial data aren’t skewed and that it is reasonable to extrapolate to Edna, we accept that we will have to treat many Ednas for one of them to benefit. With any preventative measure, even if effective, as age advances the benefit, however measured, must diminish. As we are recognising perfect control (for example shifting HbA1c even lower in the elderly) may add little benefit and then only when assessed at population level, how many of Edna’s tablets will improve the duration or quality of her life one jot? How much is any marginal benefit costing the taxpayer given the number being treated who we know will not benefit? And if we were to deploy that resource somewhere else in the health system, could the health benefit not be greater? I fear that I might not be helping Edna at all – but I can’t prove it.

Finally, I fear that I’m at high risk not only of not improving Edna’s lot, but actually making it worse. It’s notoriously more difficult to calculate the numbers needed to harm (NNH) from a particular intervention than NNT. But in Edna’s case, with the polypharmacy I’m prescribing I have no idea – and nor can anybody else. I know that many patients come back telling me how unwell different drugs have made them feel, and I can only surmise how many don’t return. Their safest option may be non-compliance –perhaps, perversely, we should hope that they’ve taken the intelligent decision and stopped them unilaterally! Of course we all know the specific drugs that can cause hypotension or dizziness but I have no idea about the cumulative effects of the cocktail I’m dishing out! With NNT often less than 1:100 it seems to me highly likely that NNH are considerably less. We’re not good at identifying the balance of good and harm yet even for solitary drug therapy and there’s increasing recognition of a ‘J’ shaped curve for risk versus tight control in a number of conditions. We are nowhere near quantifying the harmful effects of polypharmacy, especially in the elderly where natural physiological reserves are diminished anyway. So I fear that fall, that anaemia, that confusion might not be happening despite my intervention, but because of it – but I can’t prove it.

So is my prescription for Edna good medicine? I doubt it. I suspect a large amount of taxpayers’ money is supporting non evidence-based, non-beneficial interventions with the potential for harm. I’m striving towards my targets driven by financial necessity; I’m keeping the pharmaceutical industry solvent; I’m keeping a number of healthcare professionals gainfully employed in the process whilst doing my best to persuade Edna that all this treatment is really doing her good when she doesn’t feel it. But, as for me, I feel uneasy with this rigid adherence to protocols. Life consists of more than illness labels and we must always think about how we as doctors can add to the overall quality of a person’s life and not focus narrowly on illness. The purists have pushed us away from ‘good-enough’ care and we have colluded by thrusting our ‘evidence’ for more stringent diagnosis and intervention on an unsuspecting and naive public who have been unable to mount cogent rebuttals – and asked them to pick up the tax bill to boot!  I fear that we are becoming worse doctors, not better ones – but I can’t prove it.

Dr Phil Yates

GP and Chairman of GP Care

Chair of National Association of Provider Organisations (NAPO, NAPC’s Provider Network) 

Greater collaboration between primary care and other NHS services

Written: 25 February 2015

Greater collaboration between primary care and other NHS services

An increase in GP numbers alone is not enough to solve the workforce pressures in primary care, according to the NHS Confederation and National Association of Primary Care. The bodies have therefore called for an alternative approach to workforce planning, in a joint response to a commission by national training body Health Education England on workforce and models of primary care. The commission, chaired by Professor Martin Roland, professor of health services research at the University of Cambridge, has been tasked with identifying and highlighting innovative models of primary care that will meet the future needs of patients and the NHS.

Arguing that a whole-system approach is imperative to the development of a future workforce model, the submission calls for more integrated working between primary care and other services and highlights the need to overcome barriers currently inhibiting the implementation of new models.

The joint response states “medium-to long-term planning for the primary care workforce requires a patient-centred and population-based approach if it is to be effective" and that such an approach “must be underpinned by enhanced skills-mix, new capabilities, and regulatory and training curriculum change, supported by financial modelling.”

The joint response sets out innovative ways of working which take a population health management approach and to better meet the needs of patients. This includes on-the-spot screening on the high street, improving data for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease care and a new outreach role for receptionists.

Dr Nav Chana, Chair of the National Association of Primary Care, said:

“Building on our joint paper with NHS Confederation ‘Not more of the same’ our evidence submission argues that an increase in GP numbers alone is not enough to solve the workforce pressures in primary care and that primary care workforce planning and the modelling assumptions underpinning must incorporate the skill mix needed to support new, emerging and more sustainable models of care.”  
 
“By using current workforce modelling assumptions focused on the model of care we currently have and around individual workforce groups could lead to an unsustainable system.
 
“Building on the National Association of Primary Care's (NAPC) 7 Point Plan and alongside the NHS Confederation, we have gone on to set out the important principles that both our organisations believe should underpin workforce development for primary care. A more sophisticated model of workforce planning is needed to better support and meet the needs of all our members across the NHS and encourage more integrated working between primary care and other services. We also  highlight the barriers that our members tell us, currently inhibit them from implementing new models of care, setting out the changes in primary care workforce planning and training that we think will better enable these to be overcome.
 
“Our members working in primary care and across the rest of the NHS agree that it is vital that primary care is empowered to deliver patient-centred population health care. They also support and encourage increasingly collaborative models, in the form of primary care networks, enhancing the skill mix of the workforce we already have to maximise the value of primary care for our communities."

To read the submission on Health Education England’s Commission on Primary Care Workforce please  see the attachment. 

ENDS

 Notes to editors

The NAPC represents and supports the interests of all primary care professionals including general practitioners, nurses, practice staff, pharmacists, opticians and dentists. 
For more information about their work,www.napc.co.uk

• The NHS Confederation represents all organisations that commission and provide NHS services. It is the only membership body to bring together and speak on behalf of the whole of the NHS. We help the NHS to guarantee high standards of care for patients and best value for taxpayers by representing our members and working together with our health and social care partners.
• We make sense of the whole health system, influence health policy and deliver industry-wide support functions for the NHS.
• Follow the NHS Confederation press office on Twitter @NHSConfed_Press
• A full list of NHS Confederation press releases and statements can be accessed on our media page
• Contact Veronica Parker on 020 77998633. For out of hours media enquiries, please call the Duty Press Officer on 07880 500726.
 

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PRESS STATEMENT - 19 FEBRUARY 2015 Revision of marginal tariff

Written: 19 February 2015

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine

 

PRESS STATEMENT - 19 FEBRUARY 2015
Revision of marginal tariff

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine welcomes the announcement this morning from Monitor and NHS England in which the marginal tariff is revised from 30% to 70%. This will result in a substantial improvement in the finances of acute trusts, particularly those for whom acute admissions are a substantial and
increasing proportion of their work. 

The College has argued for years that the effect of the marginal tariff guaranteed financial and operational failure for acute trusts with elective care activity used to cross subsidise acute care and a consequent bed occupancy
rate that ensured poor A&E performance at times of increased admissions.

 Dr Clifford Mann, President of the College said, “Having been vociferous, informed critics of the current marginal tariff it is of course welcome news to hear it has been revised. The RCEM will continue to demand that this money is spent on front line services relevant to the admission of acutely ill and injured patients and not diverted for other purposes.”


-Ends-


Contact
For further information, or to speak with a spokesperson for The Royal College of Emergency Medicine, please contact 0207 067 1275 or email: matt.chorley@collemergencymed.ac.uk


About the Royal College of Emergency Medicine
The Royal College of Emergency Medicine is the single authoritative body for Emergency Medicine in the UK. Emergency Medicine is the medical specialty which provides doctors and consultants to (Accident &) emergency departments in the NHS in the UK and other healthcare systems across the world.
The Royal College works to ensure high quality care by setting and monitoring standards of care, and providing expert guidance and advice on policy to relevant bodies on matters relating to Emergency Medicine.
The Royal College has over 5,000 fellows and members, who are doctors and consultants in emergency departments working in the health services in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and across the world.

 

Publication of Exit Block in Emergency Departments 6 month review

Written: 19 February 2015

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine had published Exit Block in Emergency Departments – 6 month review.

This winter, performance against the 4 hour standard has deteriorated across all four nations of the UK. This means Exit Block has worsened.
In September 2014, we launched our Exit Block campaign, and wrote to all Trust Chief Executives in the country asking them to ensure tackling Exit Block was a priority. Six months on, with the recent winter pressures and increasing A&E attendances, we are reaffirming our commitment to this issue, and reinforcing the
need for the problem of Exit Block and crowding in emergency departments to be tackled.
This new report brings together the latest research on crowding and Exit Block in EDs, including national statistics on the impact of Exit Block, alongside personal accounts from A&E consultants of the impact of crowding and Exit Block in their departments.
The launch of our report comes just after the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, announced the UK government’s plans to reduce the number of avoidable deaths in the NHS. Tackling exit block must be part of this initiative as it accounts for hundreds of deaths per year.
The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has made eight specific recommendations to Hospital Trusts to assist them in dealing with crowding and exit block in emergency departments. The recommendations can be read in the full report.

The President of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, Dr Cliff Mann, said:
“Exit block remains a serious problem and is continuing to impact severely on patient safety. We know that where exit block occurs, mortality rates increase, operations are delayed, and overworked staff in A&E departments experience stress and burnout. We’re calling on hospital chiefs across the country to implement our recommendations for tackling this pernicious problem.”

Additional resources

- Exit block is explained in detail in this video: Exit Block: What it is and why it is dangerous
- Watch this short video to see how Musgrove Park Hospital in Somerset is tackling exit block
- The College’s eight recommendations for dealing with exit block and crowding in A&Es were first outlined in the document Crowding in Emergency Departments. This guidance was endorsed by NHS England, Monitor and the Trust Development Association in their 2014/2015 winter planning guidance

Contact

For further information, or to speak with a spokesperson for The College of Emergency Medicine, please call 0207 067 1275 or email: matt.chorley@collemergencymed.ac.uk.

About the Royal College of Emergency Medicine
The Royal College of Emergency Medicine is the single authoritative body for emergency medicine in the UK. The College works to ensure high quality care by setting and monitoring standards of care, and providing expert guidance and advice on policy to relevant bodies on matters relating to emergency medicine.
The College has over 5000 fellows and members, who are doctors and consultants in Emergency Departments working in the health services in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and across the world.

You can downlaod the 6 month review below.

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Stronger Together

Written: 9 February 2015

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is pleased to announce a number of new affiliations with other national representative healthcare organisations.  The NAPC will now be working closely with the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, the Optical Confederation and the National Community Hearing Association.  These organisations join our established working relationship with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.  Senior Leadership from these organisation have now been co-opted onto the council of the NAPC. Also, as the voice of primary care for the NHS Confederation, we are creating a force for change through a ‘stronger together’ relationship.       

Download the full press statement below.

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NAPC present PIN2 at the Dementia Health and Social Care Stakeholder Event

Written: 3 February 2015

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) were proud to take part in the Dementia Health and Social Care Stakeholder Event in London on 2 February, represented by Katherine Andrews.

This highly informative event, featuring a World Café, was titled “Looking Back and Moving Forward, Dementia - it’s everyone’s business”.

Professor Lisa Bayliss-Pratt, Director of Nursing Health Education England introduced the workshop where the range of projects generated by the HEE Dementia Priority Project were presented across two one hour sessions. Attendees could visit six projects to ask questions and understand the breadth of work taking place. There were sixteen projects in total ranging from creating principles and standards for HEI Curricula in Dementia Education to the practical memory activities delivered by the House of Memories in Liverpool.

“Looking Back and Moving Forward” was very much the theme of the NAPC presentation, sharing and reviewing the lessons learnt from our Practice Innovation Network’s 2nd Project. This collaborative pilot project with Health Education England was to train Primary Care Navigators for Dementia. Our trainees are based in GP Practices and Pharmacies and their role is to listen and guide patients and carers to the support they need when dealing with dementias. Following a year of training and implementation, we are now in the data collection period and are already designing our next project based on the lessons learnt so far.

The expertise and knowledge shared during each session at the World Café was valuable time spent, furthering our understanding of the enablers and barriers to implementing this vital role. It was a privilege to be able to talk about the challenges and share the learning. The World Café style was a really quick and easy way to get a better understanding of the breadth of resources navigators can use to help patients, such as the Dementia Carer Videos and Dementia Roadmaps.

Thank you to Health Education England and especially Nick Jupp and Moira White at Health Education South West who made it possible for us to be a part of this informative and inspirational day.

As a valued member of the NAPC, you can get involved in a Practice Innovation Project, contact napc@napc.co.uk to find out more. Click on the Download button for a copy of Katherine's presentation.

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Structure is Here to Stay

Written: 30 January 2015

It is a sign that an organisational structure is here to stay when it gets its own representative body.  In December   the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) hosted the inaugural meeting of an organisation intended to support and promote the development and growth of GP federations and similar organisations providing out-of-hospital care. Federations, which could morph into multispecialty community providers (MCPs), are expected to be the key members of the new National Association of Provider Organisations (NAPO).

NAPC believes around half of all GP practices are now members of some sort of larger-scale provider organisation. NAPO’s first chairman, GP Dr Phil Yates, who also chairs Bristol-based GP Care, told the initial meeting that the federations and similar groups already signed up to the new organisation covered a population of around 3 million. He described federations as an evolving response to the aim of delivering primary care at scale. During the meeting, participants discussed both the functions of the new organisation and the issues and work it should initially pursue – the latter based partly on the challenges some federations have faced so far. These include the reluctance of some clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to see federations as appropriate and credible potential contractors, often citing potential conflict of interest with GPs. Some participants felt CCGs continue to be risk-averse despite seeking innovation. Others felt that CCGs and other parts of the health service did not see federations – particularly those that were for-profit – as “part of the NHS family”.

However, Yates and others were anxious to point to the opportunities afforded by the system’s direction of travel – including NHS England’s Five Year Forward View. There was a feeling that federations should seek to work as multi-professional groups – in line with the vision for MCPs. PCC’s chief executive, Helen Northall, pointed out that much of PCC’s work on federation development and support had come at the request of CCGs keen to see larger scale out-of-hospital providers with a local base and knowledge. Northall said: “There is an opportunity for federations to be central to systems of care for patients. We have examples of federations that have worked with NHS trust providers to deliver better services together. “CCGs are looking for general practice to work with other providers to deliver value through outcome-based commissioning.” She said that PCC would work closely with NAPO wherever possible and continue its work in developing and supporting individual federations.

NAPO will initially hold quarterly meetings and system-wide thought leadership will be a key part of its activities. Over coming months it will aim to address working with commissioners and federations’ potential role in delivering the workforce changes needed to deliver out-of-hospital care. NAPO will propose solutions for potentially thorny NHS development problems like how to support the delivery of more care in the community. The NAPC will provide secretariat and other support, although NAPO will also charge a modest membership fee. NAPC president James Kingsland said: “If we can represent organisations providing primary care at scale to 10 million people, including through working with other countries in the UK, then that is a pretty powerful voice,” Kingsland said. He added that the alacrity with which providers have responded to the changing NHS explains the need for the new organisation. “It was expected that commissioning would be the catalyst for change but it seems to be the providers who are evolving and responding more quickly.” For more information on NAPO please visit http://bit.ly/1uu3EPQ

Letter to CCG chairs from Dr Chaand Nagpaul, GPC chair :Managing workload to deliver safe patient care

Written: 28 January 2015

To CCG chairs and board members                                                                                               20 January 2015

Dear CCG chair,

You may be aware we have just published a document "Quality first: managing workload to deliver safe patient care" (available on the BMA website) which has been sent to all GPs and Local Medical Committees.  The document provides guidance to practices to manage their workload at a time of unprecedented workload pressures, so that they are able to ensure their focus is on fulfilling their contractual and professional duty to deliver quality and safe primary medical care services to patients.

As a CCG chair, you and your governing board will be only too aware of the strain on your member GP practices, struggling with excessive and often inappropriate demand that exceeds their capacity, and which is detracting from their ability to provide the access and care their patients need.

CCGs are of course pivotal in supporting GP practices at this difficult time, and can use their commissioning levers to:

  • Stem inappropriate or unresourced workload demands on practices,
  • Ensure that workload shift, where practices are willing to take this on, is appropriately funded as a commissioned service
  • Improve systems across the primary/secondary care interface, for instance addressing bureaucracy such as re-referrals for missing appointments, chasing hospital results or information, or clinically inappropriate transfer of work or prescribing. This will free up time and appointments, to enable GPs to be better available for the core needs of their patients
  • Shape demand via local initiatives to empower patients with self-care and signpost them to use services appropriately
  • Support GP practices to work collaboratively where this is desired
  • Provide resources for new technologies that will help manage workload more effectively, and be beneficial to patients
  • Support the development and capacity of general practice, to include workforce and premises

A strong infrastructure in general practice will of course be key to managing overall pressures in your local health economy, and the move towards co-commissioning, along with many of the measures set out in the ‘Five Year Forward View’ will increasingly focus on the need to support and develop general practice.

If you are not doing so already, it would also be extremely helpful in supporting practices to deliver safe and high quality care to patients if you could consider:

  • Having a standing item in all your board meetings to discuss the pressures on GP practices, and how your CCG could put in place measures to support GPs and their primary care teams.
  • A policy that  that all commissioning strategy and decisions are accompanied by an impact analysis on GP practices, since achieving cost efficiencies or making changes in one sector so often has unforeseen workload implications on GP practices
  • Work with your Local Medical Committees to enable a shared and productive approach to the above.

Finally, we do recognise the hard work that CCGs are doing in an extremely challenging environment, and I hope you will receive this letter in the spirit of our collective support to enable GP practices to manage their workload in order to deliver optimal quality care to patients.

I would be appreciative if you could circulate this letter to your Board members. Please do not hesitate to contact me at info.gpc@bma.org.uk if you have any comments or suggestions

With best wishes

Dr Chaand Nagpaul

Chairman of General Practitioners Committee

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LEADERSHIP PROGRAMME FOR GENERAL PRACTICE

Written: 8 January 2015

Arana, Health Education West Midlands and NAPC

LEADERSHIP PROGRAMME FOR GENERAL PRACTICE

A Triumvirate Approach

AIM OF THE PROGRAMME

The key aim of the programme is to provide a leadership approach adopted by three key roles within general practice; GP, Practice Nurse and Practice Manager. This triumvirate leadership approach will allow the organisation to optimise its success in these challenging times and build a sustainable approach for the practice team. By working together the practice can unlock its true potential.

Themes will include:
Service Redesign, Business Development, Patient Experience, Improving Patient Access, Change Readiness, Leadership in Primary Care, Succession Planning and Programme/Project Methodology.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

The programme is aimed at a practice that is looking to shape and change for the future. We are looking to receive applications from a practice team inclusive of a GP, Practice Nurse and Practice Manager.

LAUNCH DATE AND TIME COMMITMENT

This exciting programme launches on the 4th March 2015 and takes place over a six month period. Following the launch event there will be a suite of ten half day structured learning sessions and the opportunity for group sessions (peer/action learning). These sessions will be structured to accommodate the needs of the cohorts as far as possible.

PLACES ARE LIMITED

The programme will be limited to 24 practices across the West Midlands covering all LETC areas.

If you would like to apply for this, please fill out the form below.

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PRESS STATEMENT : Autumn Statement

Written: 3 December 2014

NAPC’s 7 Point Plan delivers the priorities set for a sustainable Primary Care

On the day of the Autumn statement NAPC welcomes the announcement of approximately £2bn allocated to the NHS, with Jeremy Hunt confirming that £1bn will be invested in ‘community and primary care facilities’.

NAPC recognises that Primary Care is at the heart of every community, putting it in the unique position to empower patients to lead healthier lives. The Five Year Forward View (FYFV) strongly supports preventative care for future generations, and for the future of the NHS.

NAPC is already at the forefront of defining and testing new models of working through its Practice Innovation Network (PIN) and the newly formed National Association of Provider Organisations (NAPO). The PIN continues to empower practices and community providers, through working with others, to improve the health and wellbeing of local people. The support for the Network continues to grow through its membership as it facilitates opportunities for practices and federations of practices to engage with their community on a practical level.

Dr Nav Chana, NAPC Chairman said:

"I welcome the additional funding for the NHS, with investment targeted to primary care. This will support the development of new models of primary and community care as set out in the FYFV. New models of care focused on improving outcomes that matter to people can go a long way to providing the solutions we need for a sustainable NHS."

Dr Nikki Kanani, NAPC Honorary Secretary said:

“Primary and community care is under considerable pressure, and the additional funding is a much needed investment. We hope that this is the first step towards creating a stable NHS that can embrace innovation. However there is a need for demonstrable solutions which can support the implementation of the ambitions within the Autumn Statement and the FYFV, and create the culture changed needed to really change the way we care for our patients, and our 7 Point Plan delivers this.”

NAPC 7 Point Plan;

1.  Defining the value of healthcare around outcomes that matter to patients including health and wellbeing.

2.  Supporting new models of primary care provision through collaborative networks for the purpose of improving population health outcomes.

3. Aligning incentives and contractual models that support improvements in local population health outcomes, leading to accountable care approaches.

4.  Developing a workforce that is responsive to the needs of a population, not fixating on any particular group.

5.  Supporting real time innovation across collaborative networks, to demonstrate new models of provision and promote integration of care around patients and populations.

6.  Purposeful (not just positional) leaders representing the breadth of primary care.

7.  Inflencing policy to support the ambitions above.

 

Press release: NAPC welcomes prospect of more NHS funding.

Written: 1 December 2014

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) welcomes the announcement by Chancellor George Osborne yesterday, ahead of his Autumn Statement on the additional £2billion funding for the NHS for 2015/16.

NAPC understands that Mr Osborne will be endorsing the NHS Five Year Forward View (5YFV) in his speech this week, which has been influenced by members of the NAPC Executive. 

Dr Nav Chana, Chairman of NAPC said "I welcome any additional funding for the NHS, which if directed appropriately into developing new models of care in primary and community settings focussed on improving outcomes that matter to people could go a long way to providing the solutions we need for a sustainable NHS"

NAPC's 7-Point Plan presents some of the solutions for colleagues across the breadth of primary care to deliver against the ambition of the FYFV. 

Primary Care at Scale

Written: 27 November 2014

NHSE's 5 year Forward View makes it clear that 'Primary Care at Scale' is here to stay. There is now widespread interest in setting up Provider Organisations to support care delivery in the community and support general practice as it makes a transition into new forms.

The NAPC and PCC are working together to support this and have launched the 'National Association of Provider Organisations' to network, learn from each others' experience and lobby NHS thought leaders. Its next meeting us on 4th December. If you'd be interested in more information or joining the network please contact napc@napc.co.uk for more information

My Health, My Life Achieving " Engagement

Written: 12 November 2014

Engagement and empowerment through self care

The Self Care Forum believes that the personal engagement needed to ensure the future success of
the NHS will be achieved by putting people in charge of their own lives, giving them the information
to make their own decisions and by using health services as a support and a resource when needed.
Some of the most powerful sections in the NHS Five Year Forward View, published in October 2014,
deal with patient empowerment and engagement as suggested 12 years ago in the Wanless Report,
but there is little that describes how this engagement might be achieved.
This Manifesto gives positive and practical steps to achieve maximum engagement. Only then will
the benefits outlined in the Wanless Report and the Five Year Forward View be realised.

 

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Increase in GP numbers alone not enough to solve crisis

Written: 30 October 2014

Increase in GP numbers alone ‘not enough’ to solve ‘crisis’

Any increase in the number of GPs must be accompanied by more sophisticated approaches to recruitment and retention, and a fundamental review of the model of care GPs operate in, if a looming ‘crisis’ in primary care is to be averted.


Failing to do so could lead to ‘more of the same’, with a fundamentally unsustainable service model in the medium to long term, healthcare leaders warn in a new report. 

'Not more of the same'

The warning comes as both Labour and Conservative parties have committed to increasing GP numbers in their pre-election manifestos, following calls by the Royal College of General Practice for 10,000 more GPs by 2022 to tackle the spike in demand being felt in general practice. 

But the NHS Confederation and National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) say that primary care workforce planning and modelling assumptions must incorporate new, emerging and more sustainable models of care. 

Not more of the same – a joint report by the organisations – argues that using current modelling assumptions without paying attention to a fundamental change in the model of care delivery across a population will "not add sufficient value, may promote greater health inequity and may lead to a system of care which is fundamentally unsustainable.”

The report, published on 30 October, sets out considerations for developing a primary care workforce that is fit for purpose now and in the future.

New models

The paper warns that the out-of hospital sector, and particularly the primary care workforce, are ill prepared for the new models of care needed to deal with a rise in multi-morbidities and long-term conditions. 

Such new models are expected to better meet the demands of growing numbers of patients by promoting self-management; sharing resources across the whole health and care system, and increasing capacity and capabilities to provide enhanced services; and meeting changing patient expectations. But this paradigm shift will require a new set of skills from the primary care workforce, the report says.

The paper puts forward a package of recommendations for how the workforce can be altered to meet these demands, advocating a focus on achieving population health outcomes, innovating with alternative professional roles, and changing the training given to GPs.

Dr Nav Chana, chair of the National Association of Primary Care, said: "Promoting the development of the multi-disciplinary team to ensure patients receive seamless care appropriate the their needs was at the heart of this report.”

He added: “NAPC is delighted to have been a co-author of this important report.  NAPC has cited developing a workforce that is responsive to the needs of a population and not fixating on any particular professional group as one of the key points in the Association's seven-point plan."

Whole-system approach

The report – the first joint publication by the Confederation and NAPC – says the development of a future model for workforce requires a whole-system approach. It cites a specific example of a community-based provider education networks (CEPNs) that have been set-up to provide integrated training and education models across primary care and other sectors. 

 

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NAPC - 7 Point Plan

Written: 24 October 2014

NAPC launches its 7 Point Plan at Annual Conference in Birmingham.

 

Working with our members we can provide some solutions; we have articulated our seven-point plan and look to secure the commitments made at the NAPC conference by Ministers in Government and the opposition to ensure an appropriate shift in resources to genuinely deliver the aspirations set out in the Five Year Forward View.

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NHS Five Year Forward View & 7 Point Plan

Written: 24 October 2014

National Association of Primary Care
Press Statement

NHS Five Year Forward View                                                                    24th October 2014

 

The Five Year Forward View for the NHS is long overdue.  As the Secretary of State for Health, Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt, said at the NAPC conference on 23rd October, “the plan has the fingerprints of the NAPC all over it”.

The plan is both ambitious and pragmatic, and is in line with our values and aspirations, which we have been championing for some time. These are of course in line with our seven-point plan, and the work we have been supporting around personalisation and wellness.

We are encouraged by the fact that it is being acknowledged publicly that primary care and the out of hospital sector is the solution to the problems we face together.  This is what we have always championed, representing the views of our members. 

Working with our members we can provide some solutions; we have articulated our seven-point plan and look to secure the commitments made at the NAPC conference by Ministers in Government and the opposition to ensure an appropriate shift in resources to genuinely deliver the aspirations set out in the Five Year Forward View.

Dr Nav Chana said "NAPC looks forward to demonstrating the solutions that will be needed to implement the ambitions within the Five Year Forward View. It's good to hear our track record in delivering innovative solutions for primary care provision are being acknowledged."

Dr Charles Alessi said “We are now at the start of a new journey, one that builds on our strengths and encourages us to work ever more closely with other colleagues in health and social care, to deliver the working models of care that are at the heart of the Five Year Forward View”.

Dr James Kingsland said “It is pleasing to hear from both government and the opposition that the NAPC has been recognised as making a significant contribution to the development of the Five Year Forward View for our NHS. Our values driven, solution focused organisation demonstrates practical and innovative measured implementation programmes that help our colleagues do their job better”

NAPC Responds to Prime Ministers Extra Funding to Improve Access

Written: 30 September 2014

Following the announcement today by the Prime Minister of extending funding by a further £100m for pilots to improve access to GP services, Dr Nav Chana, Co-Chair of the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) said: “We welcome opportunities for further funding of innovative approaches to accessing primary care services. There is a real need to test and evaluate how different models of care delivery can improve the health of our communities through working in collaborative networks, using technology better and developing a different skill mix within and across primary care teams. This funding gives an opportunity to evaluate at a much larger scale approaches that can enhance care to patients and our wider public.”  Dr Chana went on to say “NAPC has been working with colleagues from the breadth of Primary Care to deliver high quality, innovative services to its population base”  

NAPC will be showcasing its Innovation Projects at its forthcoming conference in Birmingham at the NEC on 22nd & 23rd October 2014.

New Leadership Arrangements for the NAPC

Written: 25 September 2014

Following their Annual General Meeting, the NAPC is delighted to announce its new Executive Committee. Dr Nav Chana, previous NAPC Vice Chairman has been elected as Chairman of the Executive.

Dr Charles Alessi, completing his term as NAPC Chair will continue in a Senior role for the organisation as Co-Chair. Commenting on the new arrangements, Dr Chana a GP for 23 years at the Cricket Green Medical Practice in Mitcham, Surrey said: "I look forward to this new leadership arrangement which will provide continuity and stability to the organisation but also allow us to grow and develop the NAPC so that we can continue to deliver our ambition of high quality population based healthcare configured around an excellent primary care system”.

Dr James Kingsland, OBE has been returned as President of the organisation and Dr Nikita Kanani has been appointed as Honorary Secretary.  Dr Nikita Kanani is a GP in South East London and CCG Vice-Chair, where she is responsible for Integrated Care, Primary Care Commissioning, Clinical Leadership and Patient/ Public Engagement. She is also the National Quality Lead for the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management.   Dr Kanani said “I am thrilled to be appointed as Honorary Secretary of NAPC, having been a member of the Council and Executive for more than five years.  I am committed to assisting and supporting our colleagues and members in my new role”.

The full Executive and biographies can be found via http://www.napc.co.uk/who-we-are

Dr Kingsland added “we also have a talented and vibrant Council of 50 members from nursing, pharmacy, optometry, primary care management as well as general practice. I’m delighted to welcome new members to Council, Dr Lia Ali, Clinical Lead for Digital Health Innovation Consultant Psychiatrist South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Sue Robinson, Head of Health Policy Corporate Policy and Communications London Borough of Bexley. 

NPCN - Embedding Personalisation in Primary Care

Written: 10 September 2014

The National Primary Care Network (NPCN) is an informal group of over 500 healthcare professionals from across primary care including GPs, nurses, dentists, optometrists and pharmacists. It holds a quarterly meeting for around 50 participants from which a report is produced. This is the latest in the series.

The Big Picture;

Person-centred care is a concept that sees patients as equal partners in planning, developing and assessing care to make sure it is most appropriate for their needs. It involves putting patients and their families at the heart of all decisions.

 

 

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NAPC & The College of Emergency Medicine

Written: 4 September 2014

NAPC and The College of Emergency Medicine Joint Working

The College of Emergency Medicine have met with the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) to discuss the ongoing challenges facing urgent and emergency care services and what steps can be taken to relieve the current pressures on Emergency Departments. The College and NAPC agree that GP's are an important component in the urgent and emergency care system and will be working together to build strategic and practical approaches to find solutions to the ongoing challenges facing these services.

 

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Measuring Wellness

Written: 3 September 2014

Measuring Wellness equipping our leaders with the evidence they need to drive transformation in care delivery

Introduction:

There is growing recognition of the urgent need to shift the health and social care system from reactivity to proactivity, from being focused on repair to driving prevention and pre-emptive action. To achieve this we recognise that public services will need to be more effectively integrated around the individual ‘customer’ rather than being organised around the provider and delivered in a siloed, fragmented way that does not meet the customer’s quality and experience needs.

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NAPC comment in response to RCGP's claim that general practice 'brought to its knees

Written: 29 July 2014

Responding to the RCGPs statement that lack of investment is leading to an overstretched service which is struggling to meet patient demand, chairman of the the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Dr Charles Alessi said:

"Primary care needs and requires reinvigoration, and we are disappointed that NHS England is not taking the steps required to do so. Repeated assaults on primary care contracts - significantly, PMS contracts held by more than four out of ten practices - are not the answer to the problems we face; investment in primary care is the solution."

Dr Nav Chana, GP at Cricket Green Medical Practice, Mitcham, and NAPC’s vice chairman, said “Of course we recognise the need to invest in primary care. However the model of care delivery needs to change so that general practice is seen as a key part of the system of care with a greater focus on improving population health outcomes, not just reacting to demand.”

The NAPC has been very active undertaking work across the country to address the challenges and demands faced by members. We are working with GP practices and community pharmacists to develop new roles of Primary Care Navigators. It is intended that this training and the PCN role will eventually be usable across all long-term conditions. The training and skill set for the PCN will involve understanding the issues, listening effectively, asking open questions, and guiding/signposting people to personalised local and national sources of the help and support they need. The National Association of Primary Care firmly believes through the use of skill mix and simple innovative programmes are the key to the issues being faced.

-ends-

Awards & Gala Dinner 2014

Written: 23 July 2014

NAPC Awards & Gala Dinner

22nd October 2014

Metropole Hilton Hotel, Birmingham

http://www.napc.co.uk/event/napc-awards-and-gala-dinner

We are delighted to announce that we are able to extend the deadline for submission for the 2014 Awards to 1st September 2014.  The ceremony will be held on the evening of the first day of Best Practice.

Ensure you and your teams get the recognition they deserve! 

The categories are as follows:

Practice Manager of The Year: click here for your submission form 

Joint Working Initiative of the Year : click here for your submission form  

Clinical Excellence Award : click here for your submission form  

Equality & Inclusion Award : click here for your submission form

Health and Wellbeing Innovation of the Year : click here for your submission form 

 All short-listed nominees will be the guest of NAPC at the Gala Dinner. 

This black tie event is not to be missed with what will be an evening of celebration, fun and some surprises! 

Tickets can be purchased via napc@napc.co.uk at £49.99 per person or discounts for group booking POA.

 

NAPC Response to RCGP Inquiry for Patient- Centred Care in 21st Century.

Written: 16 July 2014

NAPC Response to RCGP Inquiry for Patient- Centred Care in 21st Century - Call for evidence.

 

Written by Dr Nikita Kanani

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Personal Health Budgets

Written: 9 July 2014

DateWednesday 9th July 2014
Title:   NAPC Response to Simon Stevens Speech, LGA Conference – Personal Health Budgets  

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) welcomes, in principal,  Simon Stevens announcement this week on Personal Health Budgets. 

Dr Nav Chana, NAPC’s Vice Chairman and GP, Cricket Green Medical Practice, Mitcham  said “NAPC welcomes approaches that focus on personalisation with an emphasis on health and social care integration.  We see this as a key component of improving population health outcomes, something NAPC has championed. “  Dr Chana went on to say “Key to this will be defining value of approach bases on outcomes that matter to people rather than those that are traditionally measured”.

Dr James Kingsland, NAPC President OBE, Senior Partner, St Hilary Brow Group Practice, Wallasey,  said “New approaches to integrating care and utilising NHS resources in different ways must be supported by a strong evidence base and well defined metrics to assess the value of these approaches. Increasing ambition requires heightened accountability to ensure that both the 'thoughts' of the patient and the 'actions' of the tax payer are both fully realised.  Dr Kingsland added “ Speculative approaches to new ways of providing care may be very dangerous in current fiscal climate.

The National Association of Primary Care firmly believes that to solve the challenges the NHS faces in its 66th year – increasing financial pressures and a complex, ageing population – a radical change in the way we deliver care is needed. We need to work with patients and families in a new way; releasing the assets within the out of hospital system.  Since 2012 NAPC has been assisting members through an Innovation programme to seek to improve population health and focus on the whole person as opposed to the disease or condition.

END

Notes to editors:

1.The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.

2.For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

Find out more at www.napc.co.uk

Email: napc@napc.co.uk  Web: www.napc.co.uk

Tel: 020 7636 7228  Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care

Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London, W1G 9DP

Personalised Care - the Challenge for the 21st Century

Written: 24 June 2014

Personalised Care – the Challenge for the 21st Century – Dr Charles Alessi

The NHS is going through difficult times, with financial pressures increasing and increasing ageing and complexity of populations. It is becoming clearer to all of us that the only solutions to the problems we all face are going to have to be radical and far reaching and must also involve the people we treat, the patients and their families.

Primary Care is changing. The realization that it is much bigger than general practice is now accepted as are the roles other parts of the out of hospital systems play, from community pharmacists to nurses to all other allied health and local government professionals. All have their part to play and all need to be valued and respected. We live in a complex world.

Access to health information and revolutionary medical discoveries are together generating grassroots demand for personalized healthcare. Personalization in the traditional sense means individuals are able to seek healthcare services and treatment tailored to meet their unique health goals and challenges. It is very clear that a consumer-driven health system is emerging, within which people select resources to personalize their experiences and life journey.

Personalization can also be considered through a population based lens, where health systems strive to achieve value for the populations they serve, focused on health, wellness and quality of life. It is very clear that we need to frame the individual and their requirements of us as carers within the population we serve. It is possible deliver personalized healthcare within a population health perspective.

A consumer driven health system is emerging, within which people select and engage online tools, technologies and resources to personalize their healthcare to achieve health and wellness that is tailored to the values and goals of each individual.

This is evidenced by the explosion of more than 97,000 mobile health and wellness applications worldwide, used primarily for self-management of personal goals and connectively to peer to peer communities for information sharing outside of the traditional provider-patient paradigm.

All of us within primary care are in a good place to put all this into practice and I suggest there are five steps we can all take to improve the experience of people and ensure they are even more engaged in their treatment pathways.

Step 1: Reframe the conversation on the person, not the disease. People judge their experience in healthcare by the way they are treated as a person, not by the way their disease is treated. Why practice medicine or nursing by body part when you can practice your craft treating people?

Step 2: Redefine success in terms of what matters to people. Define success in terms of the person’s health and wellness goals, not solely the diagnosis or prescription of the disease.

Step 3: Try to put the person in charge of decisions about them. A personalized system supports individuals, families, or communities in making decisions about their own health, and designs care strategies by providing the full spectrum of options and how they intersect along the lifecycle.

Step 4: Shift care processes from “one size fits all” to “one size fits one”. Current clinical protocols and processes need to be augmented and personalized to the person’s lifestyle, values and personal health goals.

Step 5: Encourage people to also join the 21st century and get connected. In a personalized health system, digital technologies are used to better connect people to their healthcare team, enabling consumers to be active partners in managing their own health and wellness.

Doing this will enrich your experience as a carer, as well as making the people you treat and partner feel much more engaged and satisfied with the treatment they receive. Sounds like a no brainer to me …

Primary Care Navigator Programme

Written: 9 June 2014

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

Primary Care Navigator Programme

 

Wellbeing Enterprises CIC have partnered up with the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) to access the Primary Care Navigator (PCN) training for all of their frontline Community Wellbeing Officer staff.

The Primary Care Navigator training is designed to help primary care function better and in a more time and cost-effective way in dealing with the needs of patients and Carers presenting with signs of, or having been diagnosed with, dementia.  The role is not a Clinical role, instead the role considers the social circumstances of people with dementia and their Carers in order to signpost them to help and support within the local community.

This model aligns perfectly within the current provision offered by Wellbeing Enterprises as part of the Community Wellbeing Practice initiative in Halton.  All 17 GP Practices in the borough have a Community Wellbeing Officer that can offer patients a one to one Wellbeing Review to help patients make a plan to improve the quality of their life, which includes signposting to assets in the community that can help people to stay well – these can be local support groups, activities or other organisations that can help.

Mark Swift, Chief Executive Officer of Wellbeing Enterprises CIC, said, “I am extremely grateful to the NAPC and partnering organisations to allow our team to access the PCN training.  This is a great opportunity to skill up our frontline team in dementia awareness and dementia support services navigation, to enhance our offer to patients as part of the Community Wellbeing Practices initiative.”

Katherine Andrews, Project Manager at the NAPC, added, “The role of the PCN is essential, giving patients and their Carers someone who will listen to their needs, treat them with compassion and guide them to the resources that can help and support them. This is about looking after a person’s wellbeing, not just their condition and making every contact count.”

The PCN training also links in with the ‘Purple Book’ scheme that Wellbeing Enterprises have helped to coordinate with support from a local GP Practice, Grove House Practice.  The Purple Book is an innovative way of ensuring that people with memory problems (including dementia) not only have a record of important personal information that will enable relatives/friends and others to be contacted as required, but will ease the stress of trying to remember their various appointments (health and social) and can be used throughout medical treatment and as part of everyday life.

For more information about the Primary Care Navigator programme or the ‘Purple Book’ please contact Wellbeing Enterprises on 01928 589799 or email info@wellbeingenterprises.org.uk. The PCN training has been funded by Health Education England, Health Education South London and Department of Health, working in partnership with and the National Association of Primary Care.

 

Notes to Editor

 

About Wellbeing Enterprises CIC

Wellbeing Enterprises is an award winning social enterprise – our mission is to support individuals and communities to achieve better health and wellbeing.  We do this by educating the general public; unlocking the assets within our communities and working co-productively with our partners to tackle the underlying causes of poor health.  Further information about Wellbeing Enterprises can be found at www.wellbeingenterprises.org.uk

 

About the National Association of Primary Care

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is the home of Primary Care in its widest sense, giving local, regional and a national voice to all health care professionals working within Primary Care.  They are a non-political, non-profit making membership organisation that has been representing and supporting the interests of all Primary Care professionals.

 

Dr Charles Alessi, NAPC Chairman, Comments on PMS Practice

Written: 4 June 2014

Pulse have reported on more than 100 PMS practices set to switch to GMS under local agreement.

NAPC chair Dr Charles Alessi, a supporter of the PMS contract, described the decision taken by over half of Essex practices as ‘sad’.

He said: ‘I think that is really sad because PMS is a contract that is locally determined and which gives local populations opportunities to get an even more bespoke service. I think that is regretful, because there is enormous opportunity in PMS.’

‘I would say [to these practices]: “Think very carefully before you do that, because things may be changing”.’

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NAPC Announces New Service to Members

Written: 4 June 2014

The National Association of Primary Care is delighted to announce that it will be working in partnership with iWantGreatCare to provide a new service to members.  iWantGreatCare's vision is to harness the power of patient experience to transform the quality of healthcare.  To achieve this, iWantGreatCare works with NHS, independent commissioners and providers, developing and delivering bespoke solutions to capture and report high volumes of continuous patient feedback in real-time.  iWantGreatCare is the largest provider of the Friends and Family Test and is delighted to be able to offer it’s GP Practice Experience Solution to NAPC members, FREE for 3 years.  The web-based solution meets mandatory CQC and FFT requirements without unnecessary admin burdens.

Key benefits for NAPC members:

  • No Cost to your surgery
  • All feedback monitored to prevent gaming and system abuse
  • Unique surgery website
  • Instant Alerting whenever feedback is left
  • Continuous, real-time service with reporting and benchmarking
  • Meets GP’s appraisal and revalidation needs.

Additionally, the first 1000 Practices to collect 100 Patient reviews will receive a free Tablet device to aid the collection of reviews.

NAPC strives to support members through partnership working and innovation, Dr Alessi, Chairman of the Association said “working alongside organisations such as iWantGreatCare that hold the same values and ethos as the Association assist us to support our members to provide the best possible patient centred care”.

For more information on becoming a member of the NAPC and benefiting from the iWantGreatCare GP Patient Experience Solution go to www.napc.co.uk.  Or register with iWantGreatCare at; https://www.iwantgreatcare.org/admin/register/practiceManager/.   For further details, please email: gp@iwantgreatcare.org

 

ENDS                                                             

Notes to editors:

1.The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.
 

2.For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

Find out more at www.napc.co.uk

Email: napc@napc.co.uk  Web: www.napc.co.uk

Tel: 020 7636 7228  Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care, Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London, W1G 9DP.

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Better Access to Help Through Primary Care

Written: 3 June 2014

Better Access to Help Through Primary Care

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) and Health Education England (HEE) have joined forces to create and deliver a new training for GP practice and community pharmacy “Primary Care Navigators” (PCNs) to signpost people with dementia and their carers to the full range of support they need for all aspects of life and wellbeing post-diagnosis. It is intended that this training and role be useable eventually for all long term conditions. The training and skill set for the PCN will involve understanding the issues, listening effectively, asking open questions, and guiding/ signposting people to personalised local and national sources of the help and support they need.

The PCN project will deliver: an e-learning, classroom and on the job training for an initial prototyping group of 20 GP practices and 20 community pharmacies; a joint learning process with this first wave of practices; a formal evaluation of results; a prototype adaptable and useable nationwide.

THE ABC APPROACH

The NAPC and HEE are working with the emerging vital consensus that

getting a timely diagnosis of dementia can save people from enormous unnecessary suffering and provide much greater wellbeing - if they have easy access to that full range of support they’ll need for all aspects of life post-diagnosis. Their approach in dealing with this is to:

A. Keep it simple. The simplicity of the PCN role is essential. Trainees can be drawn from practice and pharmacy frontline staff, or in some cases from committed and capable volunteers including patients. They will be trained to keep it simple and: really listen to and understand people with dementia and carers; find out what help they feel they need; navigate them to the help that might work for them; stay available to them ongoing to be sure that they’ve found what they need or offer them other options.

B. Not re-invent the wheel. There are many excellent sources of help and support available locally and nationally including the Alzheimer’s Society, Dementia UK/Admiral Nurses, local AGE UK, the RCGP, NHS Choices, the hundreds of committed organisations in the Dementia Action Alliance and many national and small local initiatives. The challenge is not to invent another one, but to help people keep finding and using the ones they need. The existing support and information systems can and should complement each other extremely well. To help make that so the Project is working with the GUIDEPOSTS TRUST to aggregate and make all these sources of support readily available in a fast, localised and personalised way. They will also teach PCNs to find the resources themselves, without Guideposts. A 24/7 phone line will help to ensure that PCNs, and the people they’re helping, don’t struggle to find the appropriate sources of support they’re seeking from all sectors.

C. Provide help when it’s wanted. Many people with dementia and their carers have said that they would have suffered much less, and spent much less time at their doctors and going from crisis to crisis, if they had been navigated to the right help when they first started struggling with symptoms. A GP or Pharmacist can send people to a PCN at any point where guidance to good advice and support could help. They don’t need to wait for a diagnosis.                

The NAPC plans to build on the PCN initiative in extending navigation and the promotion of wellbeing to all long term conditions and to all aspects of wellbeing through GP practices and pharmacies. 

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The National Association of Primary Cares response to RCGPs Campaign

Written: 28 May 2014

The National Association of Primary Care canvassed members in response to the Royal College of General Practitioners campaign calling for increased resources for general practice launched on 25th May.

Dr Nav Chana, NAPC’s Vice Chairman and GP, Cricket Green Medical Practice, Mitcham said “Of course we recognise the need to invest in primary care. However the model of care delivery needs to change so that general practice is seen as a key part of the system of care with a greater focus on improving population health outcomes not just reacting to demand.”

Dr Sanjiv Ahluwalia, NAPC Executive Member, GP, Watling Medical Centre, Burnt Oak, commented General Practice is a vital part of a much bigger system. There are significant discussions to be had about the place of commissioning, integration, competition, and improving outcomes for populations that need to have a space within the discussions about resources within a capitated healthcare system looking to maintain quality and equity during a time of significant austerity. “

Dr James Kingsland, NAPC President, GP Partner, St Hilary Brow Group Practice, Wallasey,  said 'Out of hospital' care requires a shift of resources out of hospitals in order to provide the community based healthcare that patients want and deserve. Simply trying harder will not work. Transforming systems of care will.”

NAPC plays a pivotal role in raising the quality of generalist skills within practices (medical, nursing and allied health professionals), with a view to proactively managing patients with multiple complex medical conditions. NAPC is of the view that it is such skills that create an environment in which more patients will be able to receive an increased amount of care in their community.

Notes to editors:

1.The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.
 

2.For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

Find out more at www.napc.co.uk

Email: napc@napc.co.uk  Web: www.napc.co.uk

Tel: 020 7636 7228  Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care

Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London, W1G 9DP

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The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Announces its Network for Primary Care Practice Federations.

Written: 23 May 2014


The National Association of Primary Care today launched its Network for Primary Care Provider
Federations. The purpose of the network is threefold:


1. To provide a forum for new forms of Primary Care Providers
2. To facilitate a knowledge sharing network
3. To provide support for Primary Care contractors who wish to explore federal models of
provision


Dr Charles Alessi, Chairman of the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) said “We, at the
NAPC continue to support the leading edge of Primary Care provider development, and this
important network will assist colleagues with the current challenges faced by Primary Care
Providers. Our hosting will enable a collective powerful voice for practice federations and drive
forward the agenda to improvement of patient centred care.


Dr Phil Yates, Chairman of GP Care said “It is a pivotal time for developing Primary Care and many
areas are establishing ‘suprapractice’ structures to support delivery of patient services in the
community and core general practice.


This Network is an opportunity to learn and spread expertise to maximise patient and practice
benefits from this development”.


A Network meeting will be held on 2nd July at NAPC offices, if you would like more information on
how to participate contact napc@napc.co.uk


ENDS


Notes to editors:


1. The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representingsupporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation. Find out more at www.napc.co.uk


2. For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

Email: napc@napc.co.uk Web: www.napc.co.uk
Tel: 020 7636 7228 Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS
National Association of Primary Care
Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London, W1G 9DP

 

 

CQC : Calling Practice Managers and Practice Nurses - Your opportunity to make a difference!

Written: 20 May 2014

CQC : Calling Practice Managers and Practice Nurses - Your opportunity to make a difference!

 

CQC's new approach to primary care inspections is reliant on the inclusion of 'expert' advisors on each inspection team i.e. clinicians and professionals that bring expert knowledge to compliment that of the CQC inspectors. What is clear is that we need to include a range of these individuals, especially Practice Managers and Practice Nurses, on the inspection teams, to ensure that a robust and credible inspection of primary care services takes place.   To apply follow the steps as below. 

 

1)CV

2)Short biography (just a couple of paragraphs highlighting key professional milestones)

3)Contact Information for 2 referees (including email addresses), one must be your most recent Line Manager, Director, Chief Executive etc.

4)Professional Membership number

 

After CQC has received this information the  team can commence the recruitment process which will include DBS  and reference checks and either a short telephone interview or face to face assessment. The dedicated HR Team at the primarycarerecruitment@cqc.org.uk  mailbox will be happy to answer any queries.

 

 

Churchill Medical Centre Winners of NICE Award

Written: 15 May 2014

Congratulations to Dr Peter Smith, NAPC, Vice President, NAPC and lead GP at the Churchill Medical Centre who won the NICE Award for reductions in antibiotic prescribing.  

Dr Peter Smith will be presenting his work at NAPC's conference, Best Practice in October 2014.

Commissioning Show 2014

Written: 15 May 2014

Dr Charles Alessi will be chairing this year's Commissioning Show.  Come and meet the NAPC and hear more about Best Practice and work of the Association.

 

Comments on the recent announcements regarding improving GP access.

Written: 12 May 2014

NAPC Response to Ed Milliband's Speech on Improving GP Access.

"Access to primary care services is at the heart of the relationship between people and their carers, and the NAPC welcomes anything which makes this easier.  We also welcome the prospect of increasing investment in primary care.  The whole of the out of hospital sector really needs investment if it is to play its part in managing the financial challenges that face us all." 

NAPC Press Release 01/04/2014

Written: 1 April 2014

Press Release: 1st April 2014

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) welcomes Simon Stevens to his first day as NHS Chief.

 

Dr Alessi, Chairman, NAPC said " NAPC is the organisation that can assist in making the changes we all know are needed to transform the service.  On behalf of its members and as the exclusive primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation we will work with Mr Stevens to ensure that Out of Hospital care is the vanguard of the NHS".

 

ENDS
Notes to editors:

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confed.  Find out more at www.napc.co.uk
For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

 

 

 

Email:  napc@napc.co.uk Web:  www.napc.co.uk

Tel: 020 7636 7228 Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care

Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London, W1G 9DP

 

NAPC Response to The Pharmacy Call to Action

Written: 18 March 2014

NAPC Response to the pharmacy call to action - you can download this via the "download PDF" button on the right

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NAPC joins the NHS Confederation as its primary care provider network

Written: 4 March 2014

NAPC joins the NHS Confederation as its primary care provider network

 

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is joining the NHS Confederation as its exclusive primary care provider network. We are working hard to achieve full integration within the NHS Confederation and this process will be completed by 1 April 2015 at the latest. 

 

NAPC represents and supports the interests of all primary care professionals including general practitioners, nurses, practice staff, pharmacists, opticians and dentists. By joining the NHS Confederation – the only organisation that brings together all parts of the healthcare system - NAPC can ensure the primary care voice is fully represented on issues affecting the whole NHS.

 

Bridging the gap between primary and secondary care

Greater coordination and integration of primary and secondary care is key to meeting the changing needs of patients and improving how and where we deliver care to local populations.

 

Working together, we can help to further bridge the gap between these two parts of the service – supporting new ways of working and developing whole-system solutions to ensure a high quality, innovative and sustainable NHS for the future.

 

Double the member benefits

NAPC members now have access to NHS Confederation member products and services; including:

         member forums
         information services
         publications
         conferences and events.

 

NAPC members can also benefit from discounted member rates at our annual conference and exhibition.

 

NHS Confederation members can also access NAPC member forums and events and benefit from discounted rates at their Best Practice event.

 

Find out more

Find out more about the National Association of Primary Care and NHS Confederation member services. 

Press Statement - PMS Changes

Written: 3 February 2014

 

 

National Association of Primary Care

Press Statement - PMS Changes

Monday 3rd February 2014


The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is disappointed that NHS England has decided to implement changes to the PMS process in the way it has and that it is adopting a methodology which we believe has the potential to unfairly discriminate against practices which have delivered consistent good value over the past few years.

We totally support the aspiration to deliver best value from all of General Practice and indeed all of primary care.  We do not believe that the process which is being adopted will necessarily deliver on these aims and objectives.
 
We made representations to NHS England to implement a review of PMS adopting a different methodology where PMS practices would have been far more likely to deliver on the newer models of co-ordinated care we all espouse, but for reasons which are unclear to us, NHS England has decided to pursue an alternative strategy.
 
We will continue to work very closely with NHS England for the good of our members and their populations.  Our commitment to deliver the best possible care remains undiminished.

Dr Charles Alessi, Chairman of the NAPC said " I am very disappointed by the approach NHS England is taking.  I believe there are better ways to get to the maximisation of value for populations.  We will continue to help our members make the best out of what is a difficult situation, and work closely with NHS England and other agencies to ensure we lessen the chances of losing the significant advances that some  PMS  practices have delivered for their populations" .

Statement Ends

NAPC is a non-politically affiliated membership organisation for those working in or with primary care, including general practitioners, nurses, practice staff pharmacist, opticians and dentists.

For more information contact Dr Alessi, NAPC Chairman, directly.

Dr Charles Alessi
Chair  National Association of Primary Care, NHS Confederation
Chair  NHS Clinical Commissioners
Senior Advisor   Public Health England
Tel. +44 (0) 20 7636 7228
Mobile. +44 (0) 78 798 48678

HSJ roundtable -The Road to Recovery

Written: 16 December 2013

To read the write up, please click here

NAPC Press Release 15/11/2013

Written: 15 November 2013


 
 
 
PRESS STATEMENT


 
14th November 2013

 

 
GP Contract
 

Dr Alessi NAPC Chairman says:


“We welcome the principles underpinning the new GP contract if they genuinely incentivise GP practices to deliver high quality population based care and improve the “value” of primary care so that outcomes that matter, not just those that are easily measured are improved. 


Inevitably this needs a redesign of primary care so that providers of primary care become part of the integrated solution for our healthcare system without diminishing the core values of general practice: the ability to provide whole-person care, with effective communication and compassion, in a timely manner.


The NAPC welcomes the return of professionalism to those who deliver primary care.  We now need to work together to assist practices and all those who deliver services to people to take full advantage of the new liberties we have to deliver the best to our people and populations" 
 
End
 
For further comment contact: Dr Charles Alessi, NAPC Chairman, NAPC: 020 7636 7228
 
www.napc.co.uk
 
napc@napc.co.uk
 
Twitter @NHS_NAPC

 

For the contract changes in full: http://bma.org.uk/news-views-analysis/general-practice-contract/introduction

NHS CEO Announced

Written: 24 October 2013

PRESS STATEMENT

23rd October 2013


NHS CEO Announced


The National Association of Primary Care welcomes the appointment of Simon Stevens as the new Chief Executive of NHS England.  He brings with him the necessary understanding and experience and we are excited by the prospect of working closely with him. 

Dr Charles Alessi said " Simon Stevens has a profound understanding of the breadth and scope of primary care and I am very hopeful that he will put this to good use to initiate and support the renewal of care for our populations.  This is an exciting time to be working in the NHS and although the challenges are immense so is the potential for improvement ". 

 

End


For further comment contact: Dr Charles Alessi, NAPC Chairman, NAPC: 020 7636 7228


www.napc.co.uk


napc@napc.co.uk

Transform smaller hospitals, don't close them

Written: 23 October 2013

Transform smaller hospitals, don’t close them

21 October, 2013 | By Ian Philp, Charles Alessi, John Myatt, John Randall

The 1962 hospital plan to change acute care is alive and well, write John Myatt and colleagues. Much of the logic remains sound but the context for smaller hospitals has changed.

On January 23 1962, Enoch Powell laid his hospital plan before Parliament. While building 90 new hospitals and upgrading 134 was important, changing what happened there was the real goal. New hospitals would replace substandard institutions, offering a range of basic services for a population of 150,000 − specified by wartime surveys as the ideal catchment for non-specialist care. Geriatrics and mental health would be brought into hospital, ensuring a holistic service. An emergency service would be provided in most, but not all.

‘The legacy of the hospital plan is evident. The context, however, has changed markedly’

Powell sought to balance priorities of access and centralisation. The new district general hospital would integrate day to day care, with specialised care provided in larger centres − similar to today, much specialist treatment called for a catchment of 500,000, 1 million or more for reasons of safety and affordability.

Powell said: “The hospital plan will determine for many years to come the broad lines of development of the hospital service, and indeed of the health service as a whole. No other nation has had − or taken − the opportunity to refashion its hospitals so comprehensively and on so large a scale.”

Specialisation debate

The debate on specialisation has continued. The 1966 Bonham-Carter report recommended larger catchments to ensure economical support services and greater specialisation. In 1980, Gerard Vaughan argued for less centralisation and a wider range of services in small hospitals that were accessible, popular and conducive to high staff morale.

In 1990, the Royal College of Physicians debated whether fewer hospitals were needed to centralise care further, and in recent years specialist services such as stroke, trauma and heart surgery have been concentrated successfully in fewer centres.

Fifty-one years on, the legacy of the hospital plan is evident. The context, however, has changed markedly. In 1962, Powell sought to integrate hospital services and achieve a step change in episodic treatment of illness − the NHS was hard at work tackling communicable disease.

‘Our challenge today is to delay, prevent and minimise the onset and impact of disability’

We still need good quality episodic care today, as this is the way the majority of the population accesses care. But we also face non-communicable disease, lifestyle diseases. Our challenge today is to delay, prevent and minimise the onset and impact of disability. This is where we spend much of the health and care budget. For an important minority of the population, episodic care is ineffective and a holistic, continuous, managed service is essential.

Smaller district general hospitals are well loved, but will struggle to maintain services within current budgets
Many have said we need fewer hospitals, we must close some; others should never have been built, or even if we need them we cannot afford them.

Others say hospitals are overflowing and that it is the fault of tariffs, structures or politics that they are not viable.
Another lobby argues that it is more cost effective to deliver care in people’s homes and it is better to keep people out of hospital, so exposure to disease is reduced. Communities, however, value smaller hospitals. They are considered to be local and personal, and politicians who try to close them discover this is an electoral battleground. Local hospitals are seen by many as the true manifestation of the NHS.

‘The question of what to provide and how locally to provide it remains a fine balancing act of access, quality and affordability’

In some ways the dilemma has not moved on much since 1962. A central question is: “How close to patients should we provide different types of care?” and “When is it safer and more cost effective to centralise services in larger centres?”

Technology and clinical practice have moved on, the specialist care of 50 years ago is routinely treated locally today − the conveyor belt of specialism will always be there − but the question of what to provide and how locally to provide it remains a fine balancing act of access, quality and affordability.

Today some smaller district general hospitals are challenged financially and in terms of quality of care. In looking at several small hospitals, with incomes of less than £250m and operating within mixed urban and rural catchments, three common and linked problems have emerged that affect financial viability and the ability to sustain high quality services.

When combined, the problems listed below can perpetuate a spiral of decline:

• staffing − the recruitment and retention spiral;
• catchment − the sub-specialisation spiral; and
• reputation − the referral spiral.

The financial challenge of realising a 4 or 5 per cent recurrent annual saving merely exacerbates the issue, pulling more and more hospitals into difficulty.

These factors can interact in a negative way, putting question marks over the future of institutions and leading to decommissioning of services.

At the root of the problem lies staffing. An inability to recruit and retain enough consultants and middle-grade doctors makes rotas unsustainable. A small team limits opportunities for sub-specialisation, making posts less attractive, and a transitory workforce increases pressure on permanent staff, affecting retention and recruitment.
A lack of permanence impacts on reliability and productivity, which has a knock on impact on referrals. Essential elective income is diminished, making it harder to cover fixed overheads. Clinicians see a narrower range of cases and this impacts their skills. The threat of closure can loom large, creating defensiveness and possessiveness, but are there other ways of proceeding?

Smaller district general hospitals can play a vital role in the future, but they and those around them must change
The catchment and staffing spiral of small isolated units can be broken. Changes to medical practice associated with sub-specialisation, technological innovation and new clinical practice will fundamentally alter the requirement to base large groups of clinicians and infrastructure in one place. Instead, professionals will work across a range of settings − tertiary, secondary, primary − in virtual teams.

There are four business models that can be the foundations for the modern, local, deconstructed hospital. They are:
• elective;
• emergency;
• support; and
• integrated.

The first three models require small hospitals to work in networks with tertiary and other local hospitals, to refashion what is provided, where and by who. Groups of hospitals specify formal consolidation of their clinical teams specialty by specialty, based on an activity analysis.  Irrespective of size, pedigree or history, a partnership of equals is envisaged and each must play its part on an equal footing.

At the heart of the approach is a tiering of acuity across sites, manifested for elective care in pre-operative assessment and, for emergency medicine, in ambulance protocols. A networked approach to emergency medicine may reduce hours of operation in some hospitals, particularly overnight, when volumes can be low. Solutions will be different in cities, urban towns and rural areas.

Certain procedures might be centralised on a single site, one hospital might take the lead for a group of procedures or a whole specialty, or teams may merge across two or three hospitals. Support services should be consolidated as a matter of course. Hospitals would develop policies and procedures together and commission IT systems in tandem to allow for interoperability.

One stop shop

Services would need to use the “one stop shop” approach to minimise travel time – clinicians would work at single sites for whole days. An obvious benefit is the exposure clinicians have to varied caseloads and the opportunity for team members to sub-specialise. The beauty of the model is that advances in clinical practice can be planned for on a larger scale.

If the success of the first three business models is reliant on establishing a large enough catchment to sustain viable teams and rotas, the integrated model is about tackling non-communicable disease for multiple morbidity groups.

General hospitals can become centres for integrated care. This business model calls for a population health and person centred approach − the emergence of a hospital without walls − a locus for primary, community and social care and centres for the delivery of integrated health and wellness services.

Groups of clinicians and support staff work in homes, the community, primary care centres and hospitals in distributed, technology enabled teams, supported by high quality patient information and central coordination centres that schedule work in line with agreed care plans and monitor patients remotely.

‘By grasping the need to design systems around people we are far more likely to succeed in our quest to delay non-communicable disease complications’

They operate actual and virtual wards together, caring for the frail elderly and those living with multiple chronic diseases in settings based on need. They host multispecialty clinics, and the skills of case management are central to providing high quality support to well informed patients.

These health and wellness centres will become central nodes for integrated care in localities. Here we will experiment with a system designed around the person, with a single route of entry, in which all the necessary services interdigitate. Therefore, a single appointment for a diabetic may include a health coach, podiatrist and gym session, as well as biomedical intervention. By grasping the need to design systems around people, as well as personalising offerings, we are far more likely to succeed in our quest to delay non-communicable disease complications.

Devolved health system

In Powell’s 1962 world, implementing such models, while not easy, could realistically be conceived of. Today we live in a devolved and cecentralised health system, within which services are commissioned and EU law applies.

The mechanism for service change, the acute service review, has been hit and miss, time consuming in the design phase and frequently rowed back from in implementation. Mistrust between organisations and an inward focus on the NHS family creates a corrosive atmosphere in which change becomes hard. Organisational merger is also fraught with legal challenge and failure to deliver benefits.

Organisational failure creates more work and casts a long shadow. Health economy solutions of the type advocated here are in the best interests of commissioner, providers and patients alike. Providers should work with commissioners to specify a range of alliance contracts, competed if necessary, to optimise care for patients.
These will allow all to share in success and remove the nugatory focus on winners and losers. In time, new organisations may emerge from the different business models and some may expand nationally.
The road is not easy, but it is worthwhile.

John Myatt is strategic development director at Serco, Professor Ian Philp is chief medical officer at Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals Trust, John Randall is medical director at Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals Trust, and Dr Charles Alessi is chair of the National Association of Primary Care

Readers' comments (4)
• Patrick Newman | 21-Oct-2013 12:16 pm
An excellent article that should be read by the politicians, especially Burnham. This is thinking out of the ever expanding impersonal box.

Technology and expertise periodically resets the 'paradigm' of big is blessed. Economies of scale do not apply at all times and everywhere with

service industries - particularly health.
• 
sjburnell@focused-on.com | 21-Oct-2013 4:31 pm
This article deserves greater & wider exposure.
• Ian Gillespie | 21-Oct-2013 5:12 pm
Good article, well presented.
The concept of a 'visiting hospital', as an outreach service from the major foundation trust, is one that can deliver local care in an innovative way without destabilising exisitng workforce or systems.

• Anonymous | 21-Oct-2013 10:49 pm
The problem is stopping clinicians inappropriately treating patients in some places ; stopping clinicians inappropriately denying access to care in others and providing reasonable access more generally than is available now.
This will not happen while clinicians workload is unregulated; capacity in popular centres is limited and there is no effective competition in the NHS or within the private sector because of the shortages of hospital specialists.

 

Change can't come soon enough for the NHS and primary care

Written: 8 October 2013

Click here for the original aricle

 

We are going through an accelerated pace of change. The airwaves are full of impending changes from better management of older people to a review of out of hours. Why is this all happening now and is it welcome?

2012 and 2013 have been difficult years for the NHS. We have been through major structural reform, not always welcome by all, and have also been rocked by scandals as profound as Mid Staffs, Winterbourne View and Morecambe Bay. In many respects we were at a low point. It could be viewed that all these scandals were the product of a culture within the NHS that was allowed to develop unchecked over the years. This was characterised by central control, loss of autonomy, micromanagement and a sense of disempowerment among those who were in contact with patients. There are some who say these scandals were inevitable, the product of the culture that had been allowed to develop unchecked and of a system where managing upwards was far more important than managing downwards.

The proposed changes around the accountable GP and a rethinking of the organisation of out of hours are thus welcome as they reintroduce care, compassion, dignity and respect back into the way people are cared for. Why is this the case?

Caring for the most vulnerable within our population is to be welcomed; I feel this is what primary care is supposed to deliver. There are other things that need to happen, especially around the artificial barriers that exist between general practice and community services. These have been allowed to persist for far too long.

Similarly the return of practice responsibilities around out of hours care is to be welcomed. The model which was introduced disenfranchised primary care and this needs to be put right. Yes, we need to think around new models of delivery but there are many now to act as exemplars.

For both these policies to succeed, other things need to happen. We need to declutter primary care of all the unhelpful processes that it is now forced to implement to get renumerated. We also need to rediscoverPersonal Medical Services (PMS) which have conveniently been sidelined as they did not fit within the central command and control culture that still dominates in parts of the NHS. The changes to currencies cannot stop with primary care however. We still operate an illogical system where we have capitated-based contracting in part of our system and activity metrics in another. The system is fragmented and often works suboptimally.

We also need to think of ways to make 24-hour care easier for practitioners to operate. Again the substantially increased premiums for medical indemnity are a deterrent. The NHS can act here and reintroduce elements of indemnity.

However I believe there is something more profound happening in health and social care, and these two new policy initiatives are part of a far greater movement. This is to do with the confluence of new ways of thinking around population health, personalised care and a renewed understanding of the importance of non health determinants on outcome to the person.

The shift from individual to also include population health is inexorable and accelerating. It leads us to increasing value for individuals and by allocating and using resources to maximise benefit and minimise harm and waste.

Personalisation is the other driver, with individuals looking to a partnership with their clinicians and self care. This entails a more tailored approach to the delivery of care and the new initiatives around vulnerable older people fall into this.

Thus we could well be at the start of a new age for general practice and out of hospital care. An age where we restore the morale of the professionals by empowering them to make change and regain responsibility and allowing them to regain the trust of people and populations. This will not be an easy journey and there will inevitably be setbacks but the age of out of hospital care wrapped around a person who receives care has started.

Dr Charles Alessi is chairman of the National Association of Primary Care

This article is published by Guardian Professional. Join the Healthcare Professionals Network to receive regular emails and exclusive offers.

NAPC - GP Care

Written: 3 October 2013

NAPC – GP Care

 

National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is delighted to announce that GP Care and its constituent practices has become a member of NAPC.  Dr Charles Alessi said “this is excellent news, we welcome this association and the joint benefits that it bestows on our respective organisations”

 

GP Care is a GP owned and led organisation whose objective is to facilitate the transfer of clinical services out of hospitals and into the community. Wherever possible GP Care works with existing local NHS clinicians to deliver the clinical care but seeks to improve the administration pathways and logistics in order to significantly improve convenience for patients and deliver efficiency savings for NHS commissioners.

FUTURE OF HEALTH CONFERENCE

Written: 9 September 2013

Dear Colleagues,
 
I have been involved in developing the 'FUTURE OF HEALTH CONFERENCE' to be hold from 3-4 October at Business Design Centre (London), which is focused on meeting the challenge of long-term conditions. 

UCLPartners and NHS England are working together to tackle one of the biggest problems faced by the NHS and society: the treatment of the rising number of people with long-term conditions. To address this challenge, we have launched Future of Health - an initiative that spans the health, community and third sectors, as well as industry, to create an integrated system where people are empowered to manage their conditions, drawing on the support of health care services as and when they need them.

Core to the conference is personalisation of care, quality improvement, innovation and moving towards a common understanding of the solutions for commissioning of long-term conditions. The conference aim is to bring together members of the health and care community including patients, in an interactive forum.

As an active member of the steering committee, I strongly believe this conference will act as a platform to instil the change that is needed and thus, think this will be of great relevance to commissioners and primary care. I would encourage you to attend and be part of this important discourse.

I am also pleased to be able to offer my direct contacts a 25% discount on the rates which are as follows:
*NHS, Public Sector, Academia, Voluntary Sector - £75 (inc. VAT)
- 50% Student / Trainee discount: email info@futureofhealth.co.uk to apply
*Private / Independent Sector - £480 (inc. VAT)

The discount code to be submitted during the registration process is:
PUBDISC25

Please feel free to forward the html email below onto any colleagues who you feel would be interested.

Best wishes,
 
Charles Alessi

Dr Charles Alessi
Chairman, National Association of Primary Care

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NHS Camden CCG and NHS Islington CCG - Job Opening

Written: 9 September 2013


NHS Camden CCG and NHS Islington CCG 

Joint Primary Care Clinical Director

North London

Salary £Competitive

Camden and Islington Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are at the cutting edge of health and social care transformation. The GP practices that make up our membership are at the heart of our vision to radically improve care to address the significant health inequalities and improve outcomes.  

They have great ambitions for Camden and Islington CCGs and as a result the Board and our partners only want the very best and committed candidates to take us to the next level. 

They are looking for a Joint Primary Care Clinical Director to cover both CCGs. The individual should be innovative and ambitious and will play a key leadership role in delivering the scale of transformation required to make our aspirations a reality for patients. 

Working across Camden and Islington the post holder will be responsible for leading specific strategic commissioning objectives as well as providing an independent primary care clinical voice in commissioning; leading the implementation of the primary care strategy and providing clinical leadership to improve capacity, quality and capability in primary care.

Duties and responsibilities will include:

•    Provision of clinical leadership for the implementation of the Primary Care Strategy.
•    Work with practices to devise and support the delivery of development plans for primary care and individual practices when required, working with NHS England.
•    To develop a good working relationship with all stakeholder groups including NHS England and GP’s.
•    Advise on service developments including local enhanced services and procurements, particularly where a conflict of interest exists for Governing Body members and local GPs.
•    To be Caldicott Guardian for both CCGs and co-ordinate with Senior Information Risk Officer (SIRO) and Information Governance, where relevant.
•    To support the investigation and management of the medical aspects of patient complaints, serious incidents, litigation cases and inquests.
•    Ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures and processes are in place, in liaison with the executive leads for quality, for all commissioned services of Camden or Islington Clinical Commissioning Groups.
•    To undertake any necessary training / professional updates as appropriate to maintain own professional competencies to fulfil the role.  


The appointee

You must be able to share our vision for the NHS in Camden and Islington and possess the qualities and skills to lead key components of its delivery. You will be committed to improving patient experience.  You will be an experienced leader and partnership builder, with a proven track record in making change happen, while forming constructive relationships and managing in a complex environment. You must be registered with the General Medical Council.

To apply or for more informaton
Should you wish to apply for this post email your CV and letter of application to our retained search consultant Louise Haines of Hays Executive
E louise.haines@hays.com Should you wish to learn more about this post or arrange an informal discussion with the CCGs, Louise can be contacted on T 0113 2003733
Closing date 13th September 2013 

Urgent Health UK joins NAPC

Written: 6 September 2013

Urgent Health UK Joins NAPC

 

We are delighted to announce that Urgent Health UK has today, joined National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) as a Corporate Member.  Urgent Health UK is the federation of Social Enterprise Unscheduled Primary Care Providers which committed to providing the highest quality of care for patients. 

 

Dr Alessi, Chairman of NAPC said “NAPC and Urgent Health UK share common values and aspirations.  The prospect of us working together is significant given that we are approaching the same issues from very differing positions.”

 

NAPC host roundtable with Jeremy Hunt

Written: 8 August 2013

NAPC hosted a roundtable with Jeremy Hunt yesterday, bringing togeather GP's, GP CCG leads, accountable officers, patient representatives and pharmacists as part of the DH’s consultation on plans for the vulnerable elderly, which closes next month.  You can read the article published on GP Online here

 

Follow Dr Nikita Kanani https://twitter.com/NikkiKF for twitter feed of yesterday's roundtable, or  #4betterhealth hashtag  

NAPC 2013 Awards

Written: 29 July 2013

NAPC 2013 Awards

 

**Due to overwhelming response, NAPC have decided to extend the awards submission dealine to Friday 9th August 2013, 12pm**

The National Association of Primary Care  (NAPC) are pleased to announce their launch of the 2013 Awards.

This year’s award categories include:

  • Practice Manager of the Year
  • GP, Nurse, Pharmacy, Ophthalmology Innovator of the Year
  • Young Dentist Entrepreneur Award
  • Public Health Innovator of the Year        
  • Most Productive Joint Working Initiative
  • Motivational Leader of the Year
  • Clinicians who have made significant contributions to the current NHS reforms

 

The event will be held at the Hilton Metropole Hotel, Birmingham on the 16th October 2013, on the first evening of Best Practice.

The event promises to bring together the most innovative and cutting edge thinking in health care today from both the Public and Private sectors. This will be a unique opportunity for all invitees to network and share best practice.

The awards ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate those individuals and organisations that have excelled in specific fields of health care delivery.  Most importantly the event will be about how we can improve the service that is currently provided to patients and their families.

The event is by invitation only due to the overwhelming interest, for those individuals and organisations wishing to be put forward for an award we invite to submit entries for each of the categories that are listed.  Email napc@napc.co.uk for full instructions details and Award Submission Proformas.

If you should have any queries then please feel free to contact us directly napc@napc.co.uk.  For sponsoring opportunities please contact Sally Kitt, sally@napc.co.uk

Time table

Call For Nominations - 3rd June 2013

Submission Deadline - 19th July 2013

Short List Announced - Mid September 2013

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Securing the Future of General Practice: New Models of Primary Care - Kings Fund and Nuffield Trust Report

Written: 24 July 2013

Securing the Future of General Practice

Kings Fund and Nuffield Trust Report

General practice in England is under significant strain, with many GPs and their teams caught on a treadmill of trying to meet pressures, while lacking time to reflect on how to provide and organise care for the future. To inform the challenges facing primary care, the former Midlands and East Strategic Health Authority – now NHS England Midlands and East – commissioned the Nuffield Trust and The King’s Fund to undertake a review of UK and international models of primary care, focusing on those that could increase capacity and help primary care meet the pressures it faces. Although this report has implications for the whole of primary care, the focus of this research has been primarily on general practice. We examine how GPs and their teams are responding to pressures by forming new organisations to allow care provision at greater scale. We consider what is required if primary care is to be fit for the future, proposing design principles to be used when planning future provision and suggesting what needs to be done by both policy-makers and practitioners.

 

Read the Nuffield Trust blog here

 

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Provision of community services post 31 March 2014

Written: 11 July 2013

Provision of community services post 31 March 2014


In 2011 the then Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) implemented the Government's Transforming Community Services (TCS) agenda, where the provider arms of PCTs were transferred to new providers.  Many of the contracts were for 3 years, and so will now need to be renewed or re-procured in order to maintain service provision post April 2014. 

CCGs should be considering their options for service provision post April 2014.  We are already working with a number of CCGs to help them with their decision making and processes.  This article provides a high level summary of some of the key issues that CCGs will need to take into account.  You will see that these issues need to be considered with some priority to ensure that there is time to put your requirements into practice before the existing contracts come to an end.

Click here to see the Article from Hempson's

NAPC and Ararna Workshops and Taster Sessions: book yours today!

Written: 4 July 2013

The workshops will be delivered by the two joint managing directors of Ararna Limited, both are highly qualified
facilitators with exceptional expertise. They will challenge your thinking and test your current working practices.

For more information on these workshops, please see the brochure or go to our events page: http://www.napc.co.uk/events

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Practical Advice for GP Partnerships

Written: 26 June 2013

Practical Advice for GP Partnerships

Lynne Abbess, Hempsons’ lead partner for GP practices, offers some practical advice for partnerships in light of the latest NHS changes - http://youtu.be/qywK0ocTWXE

PMS - Achieving Equity and Excellence

Written: 11 June 2013

PMS - Achieving Equity and Excellence

11th June Press statement

The reaction to NHS England's proposed National PMS Review has been predictably negative. Predicable because the sport of PMS baiting has been in vogue for several years, forgetting that the contract covers 47% of GPs .  At times, when referring to PMS, the NHS has even been abetted by medical leaders who seem to have taken the attitude that if 53% of GPs are drowning the answer is to ensure the rest drown as well. This negative attitude has been felt at the GP frontline for some time.

As a result, it is becoming harder to find salaried GPs. This is hardly surprising since it has been open season on GPs for the past 3 years. The Daily Mail recently had a week long campaign villifying GPs, the SoS blames GPs for all the NHS's acute care failings, others go a step further and pin the blame on female GPs. Despite the fact that the 9 year old 'new' contract was introduced to address an exponential increase in unpaid GP workload, GPs are still falsely accused of feathering their nests at the expense of the NHS. Small wonder that doctors are thinking twice before entering a field that is so constantly belittled. Combine this with restrictions on pension benefits leading to GPs in their 50s considering earlier retirement and we have the perfect storm in general practice.

Despite this, the Department of Health has recognised the need for more GPs, stipulating that Health Education England should ensure that 50% of doctors enter general practice and proposing an increase of 400 in the number of places for GP specialist training by 2015.  This will not work unless the anti GP tide is turned. When GPs are respected and paid appropriately, candidates queue to join the ranks. Doctors will shy away from a profession which requires lifelong commitment but which receives daily vilification, sometimes even abetted by its own leaders.

The NAPC has always supported the need for PMS to deliver value for money. It is correct to remove PMS from the slings and arrows of local fortune but only if the non-core elements are treated with respect where VFM has been demonstrated locally.  A large number of PMS practices have already been through sometimes  disruptive and destabilising local reviews to deliver this added value. It would be inequitable to put these practices through further draconian changes. At the very least, Barbara Hakin's statement regarding contract changes, which established the principle that convergence requires a seven year evolution should apply to noncore elements if significant changes are proposed.

The NAPC has been unusual in being broadly supportive of many of the recent NHS changes, particularly clinical commissioning. This is because we support the principles espoused in 'Equity and Excellence-Liberating Primary Care'.  Equity is not the same as equality. Equity implies delivery of appropriate reward for appropriate work. A striving for excellence implies celebrating achievement outside the norm, not gravitation towards a mean.

If the National PMS Review is handled according to the prevalent anti-GP, anti-PMS spirit, it will potentially drive several further nails into the coffin of general practice and will achieve equality and mediocrity, not equity and excellence. Handled well, recognising the benefits of a local contract, it could be the beginning of a move to re-establish the respect for general practice that will encourage doctors to enter the field again. Carried out with sensitivity and respect, with an equitable commitment to phase in any changes to non-core services over the 7 years referred to in Barbara Hakin's letter, the national PMS Review should allow PMS practices to organise themselves without the uncertainties of local political lotteries. As the only organisation that has supported PMS since its inception, the NAPC looks forward to assisting NHS England in achieving this aim.

End

For further comment contact: Dr Peter Smith, Vice President, NAPC:  020 7636 7228

www.napc.co.uk

napc@napc.co.uk

Dr Charles Alessi and Malcolm Qualie interview podcast

Written: 30 April 2013

Go to the Pharmacy Management website www.pharman.co.uk to hear an interview with Dr Charles Alessi and Malcolm Qualie which took place at the Seminar on April 17th. Hear their definitions of Medicines Optimisation and what this means for the patient and the whole healthcare system. Also reaction to the Francis report and an example of patient empowerment.

 

NAPC Press Statement 25th April 2013

Written: 25 April 2013

NHS funding crunch creates a challenge for GPs to improve public health          

The recent reforms to the English NHS present opportunities for GPs and other primary care staff to lead a more proactive approach to prevention and helping people remain healthy into old age but only if they are empowered to do so, argues a new report by the Nuffield Trust.

Reclaiming a population health perspective says that GPs have untapped potential to engage in a more proactive approach to improving the health and wellbeing of the local population. Such a focus is essential if the NHS is to meet the challenges of responding to rising rates of chronic illness at all ages of the population, during a time of financial austerity.

But it warns that the current NHS reforms, which have resulted in responsibility for public health being transferred from the NHS to local authorities, may risk distancing GPs in particular from efforts to improve the health of their local communities. The report concludes it will be important for the Department of Health to assess whether public health professionals are working closely with GP communities and clinical commissioning groups, building relationships and adding capacity and expertise so that general practices are able to access and use data and evidence.

The report analyses routine data taken from a notional general practice of 10,000 patients to identify potential actions to improve community health. It also draws on a series of interviews with GPs and practice managers currently developing and testing new approaches to population health management with the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) . The interviews reveal both an appetite for further change and a range of ideas about how such approaches might be realised. Together these sources point to a number of factors that set general practice up well to play a powerful proactive role in community health.

The report also charts the recent reforms to primary care which provide an encouraging basis on which to deliver more proactive services. Financial incentives for screening, immunisations and better management of specific conditions have for example already led to an increasing emphasis on prevention and to the infrastructure required to deliver these.

 

Ruth Thorlby, Nuffield Trust Senior Research Fellow and author of the report said:

‘Many people have called for general practices to take a more proactive approach to population health in recent decades. We found that in this report for the NAPC that there is enthusiasm in general practice to make this vision real: at seems to be important is to allow local practices to define what this means for themselves, alongside identifying and supporting a cadre of GPs and other primary care staff to act as leaders

'The  immediate financial pressure on the NHS  must not squeeze out investment in more prevention initiatives, which can often take several years to come to fruition.'

‘In theory, NHS England and Monitor should enable flexibility in pricing and contractual systems, which could support innovation between general practice and other providers, and tilt the financial system away from the acute sector. However this means creating space for general practice to innovate as providers and not being inhibited by concerns about conflicts of interest.’

Challenges that policy-makers may need to consider addressing to realise the full benefits of a primary care-led approach to population health include:

 

  • Many GPs not accepting that population health is their responsibility and a relative lack of training and skills to use public health data and techniques. There is now a range of risk tools to identify high-risk patients. Smaller practices, for instance those with fewer than 2,000 patients, may need to collaborate in order to get access to data tools (or indeed provide preventative services to local communities). An obvious source is clinical commissioning groups, which are expected to demonstrate a detailed understanding of population needs as part of their authorisation process.
  • Capacity and resource limitations facing many general practices. A very commonly expressed concern from interviewees was the growing workload in general practice. A priority, therefore, is to identify ways of working within general practice to make better use of existing staff, and explore using different kinds of staff in different ways. A more proactive approach is likely to imply an imaginative approach to skill mix within general practice, including a willingness to use other professionals such as staff with different backgrounds, for example as health trainers.

 

Dr Nav Chana, Vice-Chair of the National Association of Primary Care added:

This important report highlights the huge potential that primary care can make to delivering ‘state of the art’ population based healthcare.  The practices participating in NAPC’s innovation network, and whom this report is based, have espoused the values of population healthcare, which underpin NAPC’s ambitions for the health service.

ENDS

  • This research forms part of the Nuffield Trust’s programme of work that aims to support the development of new models of primary care, alongside the emerging clinical commissioning groups. It was prepared for the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC), whose newly established Practice Innovation Network aims to support GPs and practice managers to find new ways to provide population health care. The NAPC are grateful for the financial support given to them by KPMG to produce this study.

http://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/media-centre/press-releases/nhs-funding-crunch-creates-challenge-gps-improve-public-health

NAPC briefing statement on General Practices response to the new DESs

Written: 12 April 2013

With the release of the new DES’s by the NHS Commissioning Board (now NHS England) The National Association of Primary Care polled its members to gauge their reaction to the release of these new enhanced services and to see whether any common themes emerged and whether the development of further, new DES’s could be improved.

There were three key messages that were made clear by our members;

1. That the enhanced services do not provide adequate financial compensation. In the majority of cases the actual cost of implementing the services would considerably outweigh the income they provide for practices.

2. Related to the above point was that the DES’s were poorly drafted, vague and ambiguous both in how they are to be implemented on a practical level and on how the costs were arrived at as they appear to differ to the practice’s costing models

3. Finally, our members felt that the DES’s would have been much stronger in terms of clarity and financial incentivisation had NHS England consulted practices’ and their practice managers.

The NAPC as a representative body will continue to monitor the reaction of its members to new developments and we would stress our vision that General Practice should be at the heart of developing all new services and these DES’s would have been clearer, more rounded documents had there been greater General Practice involvement.

A Guide to the Francis Report

Written: 11 April 2013

NAPC'S full guide to the Francis Report can be accessed by clicking here

NAPC's reflections on the Francis report can be accessed by clicking here

The notes contained in this document are meant as a highlight to the membership of the NAPC and recommendation is made to read the full document available, as defined in the end reference. No liability is made or taken by the NAPC, its Executives or Members for the interpretation of the content. This content is made as an aide memoir to obtain a basic overview only.

Consultation on GP Contracts 2013/2014

Written: 23 March 2013

The government today published its response to the consultation on GP contracts. Five stakeholder organisations, including NAPC responded to the consultation and some changes have been made to the original proposals.

NAPC Practice Innovation Network

Written: 1 March 2013

The emphasis for the practices involved is to demonstrate the key components of population based healthcare to its registered population. In so doing the practices will demonstrate:

  • Community engagement
  • Planned, proactive care of patients with long term conditions
  • Developing strategies to reduce the health inequality gap for local communities

 

The rationale behind this network is to demonstrate a range of practical interventions that can be spread via the NAPC, locally, nationally and potentially internationally. Interventions include:

  • Redesigning the workforce, reviewing skill mix and measuring their impact on the quality and efficiency of primary care.
  • Redefining the workflow through primary care to promote proactive, community orientated care
  • Exploring interventions saluting health and well-being
  • Maximise the effectiveness of technology, specifically new innovative tools:
  • To empower patients to take control of their own care through remote coaching and mentoring programs
  • To engage with the local community using“community asset” based program
  • Tools to support the care of patients with long term conditions, including cloud based analytical software

 

For more details, or to be part of the second wave, you can contact us atnapc@napc.co.uk

Twitter @napc_nhs

Guide to commissioning high value eye care

Written: 1 February 2013

Dr Charles Alessi has welcomed new guidance for commissioners of eye care from the College of Optometrists and Royal College of Ophthalmologists.  Written by leading eye care clinicians with support from experienced clinical commissioners at the National Association of Primary Care, Royal College of General Practitioners and the Department of Health’s Right Care Team, it will provide valuable support to those designing and delivering eye care across the UK.  The guidance published today focuses on services for glaucoma and urgent care.  The Colleges will publish their recommendations on improving services for age-related macular degeneration, cataract, oculoplastics and low vision care in spring. 

Call For Nominations

Written: 1 January 1970

Call For Nominations

 

President

 

NAPC's Annual General Meeting will take place on 25th September 2013 and will be held at Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London W1.    

 

At this meeting the election of President will take place.  We are therefore seeking nominations for this post from within NAPC’s current Executive Committee.  To date we have one candidate; Dr James Kingsland, Dr Kingsland currently holds the post. 

 

Voting is open to all Members of the Association.  You can submit your vote by email to napc@napc.co.uk.  The closing date for nominations is 26th August 2013.  The full list of NAPC Executive Members can be found via: http://www.napc.co.uk/who-we-are

 

NAPC Council

 

The Association is also seeking nominations from member groups and individuals to sit on the Council of the Association.  NAPC’s Council meets up to three times a year, with the principal job being to hold the Executive Committee to account.  Nominations for Council places are open to all full members of the Association (excludes affiliate members).  Please send your nominations to napc@napc.co.uk by 26th August 2013 with a copy of your CV. 

 

For further details and information please contact napc@napc.co.uk

NAPC Awards 2014

Written: 1 January 1970

NAPC 2014 Awards

The National Association of Primary Care  (NAPC) are pleased to announce their launch of the 2014 Awards.

This year’s award categories are:

Practice Manager of the Year

Health and Wellbeing Innovator of the Year

Most Productive Joint Working Initiative

Clinical Excellence Award

 

The event will be held at the Hilton Metropole Hotel, Birmingham on the 22nd October 2014, on the first evening of Best Practice.

The event promises to bring together the most innovative and cutting edge thinking in health care today from both the Public and Private sectors. This will be a unique opportunity for all invitees to network and share best practice.

The awards ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate those individuals and organisations that have excelled in specific fields of health care delivery.  Most importantly the event will be about how we can improve the service that is currently provided to patients and their families.

The event is bookable by emailing napc@napc.co.uk and tickets cost £49.99 for those individuals and organisations wishing to be put forward for an award we invite to submit entries for each of the categories that are listed.  Email napc@napc.co.uk for full instructions details and Award Submission Proformas.

If you should have any queries then please feel free to contact us directly napc@napc.co.uk.  For sponsoring opportunities please contact Sally Kitt, sally@napc.co.uk

Time table

 

Submission Deadline - 1st July 2014

Short List Announced - End of August 2014

Press Statement: Response to a new deal for general practice speech

Written: 1 January 1970

New Deal for General Practice

Immediate release - 19th June 2015

The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) welcomes the Secretary of State for Health’s announcement today on his commitment to increasing investment for primary care in the new deal for General Practice. We also welcome the recognition of developing the primary care workforce and its importance to the future of the NHS.

 

Primary Care remains the first point of contact most of us have with our health care system and, as a member organisation representing the breadth of primary care, NAPC welcomes the initiatives to design and develop this workforce.

 

Dr Nav Chana, Chairman of the NAPC said:

“This approach to workforce development in primary care must be focused on building teams with the right skills needed to address local population care needs as well as addressing shortages in GP numbers.

We recognise the importance of improving access to primary care across 7 days, however, we need to ensure we first get the system right "in hours" and build on the evidence around patient access to avoid falling in the trap of supply induced demand. In addition there are more solutions to be explored for providing a 7-day service.”

 

NAPC also welcomes the approach to reviewing outcomes for patient groups but wish to ensure that these include an emphasis on outcomes that matter to people including wellness, prevention and self-care as well as those related to illness.

 

Dr James Kingsland, President of NAPC said:

“We welcome the Secretary of State’s commitment to reducing bureaucracy and support technological innovations that will enable professionals to spend more time with their patients. Clinicians must be liberated from over burdensome administrative work which deflects from patient care.”

 

As an organisation at the forefront of defining and testing new models of working through its Primary Care Innovation Network (PIN) and the National Association of Provider Organisations (NAPO), NAPC will continue to encourage and empower primary care to try new things to improve the health and wellbeing of local people.

 

ENDS

 

Notes to editors:

1. The National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) is a non-political, non-profit-making organisation representing and supporting the interests of all its members, both individuals and organisations working in or with primary care. It also offers support through associate membership to those bodies, which provide services to primary care or have other health-related interests. NAPC is the primary care delivery arm of the NHS Confederation.Find out more at www.napc.co.uk

2. For more information, please email napc@napc.co.uk or call 02076367228.

 

Email:  napc@napc.co.uk Web:  www.napc.co.uk

Tel: 020 7636 7228 Twitter: Follow @NAPC_NHS

National Association of Primary Care

Lettsom House, 11 Chandos Street, London, W1G 9DP